Machine

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MACHINE. A contrivance which serves to apply or regulate moving power; or it is a tool more or less complicated, which is used to render useful natural instruments, Clef. des Lois Rom. h.t.
     2. The act of congress gives to inventors the right to obtain a patent right for any new and useful improvement on any art, machine, manufacture, &c. Act of congress, July 4, 1836, s. 6. See Pet. C. C. 394; 3 Wash. C. C. 443; 1 Wash. C. C. 108; 1 Wash. C. C. 168; 1 Mason, 447; Paine, 300; 4 Wash. C. C. 538; 1 How. U. S., 202; S. C. 17 Pet. 228; 2 McLean, 176.

References in periodicals archive ?
Simple Machines, Work, Power, and Mechanical Advantage It is fairly easy to demonstrate mechanical advantage with the lever apparatus shown in Figure 4.
It's just clumsy at first, because there is so little mechanical advantage.
Vocabulary Guide: slope, work, simple machines, mechanical advantage 2.
Mechanical advantage in wheelchair lever propulsion: effect on physical strain and efficiency, journal of rehabilitation research and development.
The help we get from a machine is called the mechanical advantage. The number of rope segments in a pulley system increases the mechanical advantage.
The key innovation behind the LFC is its single-speed, variable mechanical advantage lever drivetrain.
maenas were larger and exhibited higher mechanical advantage values of the claw lever system than C.
With a locking cam system, the 1LC maintains necessary force during the cooling cycle of the fusion process and incorporates a 3.8-to-1 mechanical advantage. McElroy's patented Centerline Guidance System, which provides equal distribution of force around the joint, is included in the design, as are serrated jaws and inserts to keep the pipe from slipping during fusion.
Back in the Middle Ages, weapons called trebuchets were used to take advantage of this principle, using mechanical advantage and the gravitational potential energy of a counterweight to hurl rocks and other projectiles at or over walls.
Some designs--notably two-blade, cutting-tip heads--cut deeper because of what has been called "mechanical advantage." And hunting heavy, big game makes any advantage worth considering.
The CAS tribunal unanimously decided the 21-year-old South African's prosthetic legs do not offer him a mechanical advantage and overturned an International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) ban imposed earlier in the year.
That prompted questions about whether his thin, flat-black Cheetahs gave him an unfair mechanical advantage. The questions arose because of the unorthodox way Pistorius runs.