Introduction

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INTRODUCTION. That part of a writing in which are detailed those facts which elucidate the subject. In chancery pleading, the introduction is that part of a bill which contains the names and description of the persons exhibiting the bill. In this part of the bill are also given the places of abode, title, or office, or business, and the character in which they sue, if it is in autre droit, and such other description as is required to show the jurisdiction of the court. 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 4156.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
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Advance medical directive (AMD)--An oral or written statement by a patient with decision-making capacity expressing his/her preferences for a surrogate and/or future medical care in the event he/she becomes unable to participate in medical decision-making.
Another type of medical directive is a health care power of attorney, also known as a medical power of attorney, health care proxy, or appointment of health care agent.
In addition, Nolo Press' WillMaker computer program includes state-specific medical directive forms.
In concert with the values history, the medical directive is designed to encourage prior consideration of specific instances and types of medical treatments and interventions an individual would want performed.
While wills, power of attorney, and medical directives may not be the most pleasant topics to discuss; the Bettses contend that people need to be prepared for the unexpected.
Generally speaking valid medical directives are to be followed and there may be penalties for not doing so.
This can take the form of a client-specific order, which is a prescription for an individual client, or as a medical directive. A medical directive is an order applicable to a range of clients who meet certain conditions.
That means futile-care protocols that prohibit doctors from treating the unconscious doom these defenseless people to intentionally caused deaths by dehydration -- even if they had previously signed an advance medical directive stating that they would want their lives maintained.
This task is simplified if the patient's treatment preferences are documented in an advance medical directive or through discussion with a physician.
That act requires every medical facility that receives federal funds -- "and that's almost all of them because of Medicare," she said -- to ask people being admitted whether they have an advance medical directive and, if not, whether they would like one.
Families may wish to consult a legal assistance attorney for advice on a will, an advance medical directive, power of attorney, and/or other legal documents.

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