introduction

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introduction

noun act of bringing in, admittance, formal presentation, inductio, induction, interposition, invectio, offering, offering as an exhibit, placing, presentation
Associated concepts: introduction of evidence
See also: appearance, beginning, birth, emergence, genesis, inflow, infusion, insertion, installation, nascency, onset, origination, outset, overture, preamble, preface, prelude

INTRODUCTION. That part of a writing in which are detailed those facts which elucidate the subject. In chancery pleading, the introduction is that part of a bill which contains the names and description of the persons exhibiting the bill. In this part of the bill are also given the places of abode, title, or office, or business, and the character in which they sue, if it is in autre droit, and such other description as is required to show the jurisdiction of the court. 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 4156.

References in periodicals archive ?
Army currently use a software program, DL Wills, to draft state specific health care powers of attorney, wills, and advanced medical directives.
In addition, Nolo Press' WillMaker computer program includes state-specific medical directive forms.
In concert with the values history, the medical directive is designed to encourage prior consideration of specific instances and types of medical treatments and interventions an individual would want performed.
A will and medical directive are likely necessities, but whether or not other documents are needed will take some thought.
Generally speaking valid medical directives are to be followed and there may be penalties for not doing so.
Federal law, however, does not make an advance medical directive enforceable in a state that does not otherwise recognize and enforce advance medical directives under its own laws.
Comparision of Physician and Patient Choices and Stability in the Medical Directive," Journal of General Internal Medicine 9 (1994): 93.
Physicians then read two scenarios excerpted from Emanuel and Emanuel's Medical Directive document[20] describing (1) a coma with a low probability of recovery, and (2) an advanced stage of a progressive dementing illness.
A small booklet, written in simple language to help Catholics and others deal with advance medical directives about life-or-death decisions, is going into its second printing of 5,000 just more than a month after its debut.
A health care POA (also called an advance medical directive or health care proxy) allows the named agent to make health care decisions for the child.
All 50 states have some form of medical directive that reinforces a person's right to make medical decisions.

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