man

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man

Maori for SOVEREIGNTY.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

MAN. A human being. This definition includes not only the adult male sex of the human species, but women and children; examples: "of offences against man, some are more immediately against the king, other's more immediately against the subject." Hawk. P. C. book 1, c. 2, s. 1. Offences against the life of man come under the general name of homicide, which in our law signifies the killing of a man by a man." Id. book 1, c. 8, s. 2.
     2. In a more confined sense, man means a person of the male sex; and sometimes it signifies a male of the human species above the age of puberty. Vide Rape. It was considered in the civil or Roman law, that although man and person are synonymous in grammar, they had a different acceptation in law; all persons were men, but all men, for example, slaves, were not persons, but things. Vide Barr. on the Stat. 216, note.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a country that revered men of the cloth -- putting them on a pedestal -- the Muslim Brotherhood one-year rule single-handedly succeeded in alienating many from religious TV channels.
They were men of the cloth - men of God - their word was law and they were beyond reproach.
"A lot of the troops came from rough backgrounds and used very unvarnished language, but the padres took it in their stride." They knew the words came out from force of habit, stress, fear and need, with no intent to offend the men of the cloth.
Sister converts to the turf DOG collars, to use the colloquial, are often sighted at Cheltenham and, of course, at tracks all over Ireland, but it's not only men of the cloth interested in racing, it seems.
The mind boggles at the thought of all those men of the cloth tuttutting with disapproval as they peer into the window of their local Ann Summers.
MEN OF THE CLOTH: The Rev Philip Chadwick preaches to scarecrows at St Mary's Church, Elland COAT OF MANY COLOURS: A scarecrow takes it easy at the festival(S)
His topics include the blue sky people, burial practices, coffins and tombstones, through a child's eyes, a woman's road, the miners and prospectors, men of the cloth, echoes of the Civil War, and the undesirables.