mentors


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In addition to a mentor some professionals gain access to a sponsor, a career-enhancing counterpart to mentors.
The company also has hired an outside firm that specializes in implementing mentoring programs to train top-level staff to become mentors.
Functioning as experts, mentors provide authentic, experiential learning opportunities through modeling.
Most important, mentors should have a desire to work with pregnant and parenting teens.
Youth with disabilities may be participating in mentoring programs, but program managers and mentors may be unaware of how disabilities affect mentoring relationships.
Mentors can provide career, academic, psychosocial, and role modeling functions both within and outside of a school setting (Donaldson, Ensher, & Grant-Vallone, 2000).
As part of the scheme, an accreditation program for mentors was organized.
In education, mentors are usually veteran teachers who support colleagues and help those who are new to the profession to become acclimated to the everyday activities that take place in the schools.
Prior to serving as mentors," says Diana Bell, director of nursing at Riverwood, "mentoring candidates must attend a 'train the trainer' in-service program developed by ElderWood's Training Center staff.
There are two reasons why mentoring isn't foolproof--the mentor and the protege.
Schneider, a former teacher, is the founder of Mentors, Inc, a not-for-profit organization which matches adults with high school youth.