mentors


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Minnesota 100, also founded in 1991, provides 100 mentors for one year for 100 female employees of participating companies.
One hundred percent of mentors believed the program helped their proteges assimilate into the department, acquire and enhance their skills, identify career goals, and successfully complete their probationary periods.
How well do teaching experiences, the relationship with mentors, the student teachers' perceptions of their mentor, and perceived
In addition to a mentor some professionals gain access to a sponsor, a career-enhancing counterpart to mentors.
The company also has hired an outside firm that specializes in implementing mentoring programs to train top-level staff to become mentors.
Functioning as experts, mentors provide authentic, experiential learning opportunities through modeling.
Most important, mentors should have a desire to work with pregnant and parenting teens.
Research has documented that some of the most common positive effects for mentors include:
Women may try to seek mentors who can shed light on combining their personal and professional lives (Gilbert & Rossman, 1992), an issue that often discourages college women from persisting in fields that are non-traditional ones for women, such as science (e.
The definition of a mentor, based on the work of the external consultant was: "Mentors are influential people who significantly help you reach your major life goals" (Gibbons, 2000).
The survey administered to the UG's asked questions focusing on their experiences as a mentoree by probing their attitudes about a) the class in general, b) their learning as a result of having mentors in class with them, c) having teachers in the same class with them, d) the mentoring climate that took place in the course thus far, and e) whether or not the student would be inclined to take another split-level course in the future.