military tribunal


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Related to military tribunal: International Military Tribunal

military tribunal

noun armed services court, armed services court of law, armed services judiciary, army tribunal, judiciary of the army, military court, military court of law, military judiciary, military trial
Associated concepts: Patriot Act

military tribunal

a tribunal that is responsible for the trial and punishment of an offence against military law. See COURT MARTIAL.
References in periodicals archive ?
When WWII ended Japan was defeated, military courts were established here, 920 Japanese were executed, 300 were imprisoned, an international military tribunal in Tokyo was also established from 1946-48, it sentenced 25 more prominent leaders including Prime Minister Hedeki Tojo (Piccigalo,1979).
On Friday, he responded to various allegations made by the Military Tribunal.
Tomaz Jardim's The Mauthausen Trial is a penetrating analysis of the use of the military tribunal in seeking justice in the shadow of the Holocaust.
But human rights groups have slammed the use of military tribunals as opposed to civilian courts.
Military tribunals have come under fire from many activists for targeting the opponents of the ruling military council, but still a large swathe of the population supports such tribunals, especially when they are used against thugs and criminals, a large number of whom are still at large after escaping from prison in the aftermath of the revolution.
The prospect of the United States chargingGuantanamo Bay detainees before new military tribunals hasunleashed a torrent of protests from human-rights groups.
The subject of military tribunals garners great interest in times of war and falls into neglect in times of peace.
But then it authorizes the military tribunals to allow in secret evidence, hearsay evidence, and coerced testimony.
How should the International Military Tribunal for the Far East, which opened on May 3, 1946, be assessed?
Remarkably, the Court left open the possibility that the government might be allowed to proceed, using this amorphous and lax evidentiary standard, before a military tribunal rather than anything resembling a civilian court.
Robertson ruled that the military tribunal process violated both the Geneva Conventions and federal statutes.
The council also agreed with the view of the Attorney General Lord Goldsmith that Mr Begg would not receive a fair trial before a US military tribunal.

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