Mill

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Mill

One-tenth of one cent: $0.001. A mill rate is used by many localities to compute property taxes. For example, some states levy a one-time nonrecurring tax of two mills per dollar (0.2%) on the fair market value of all notes, bonds, and other obligations for payment of money that are secured by mortgage, deed of trust, or other lien on real property in lieu of all other taxes on such property.

MILL, estates. Mills are so very different and various, that it is not easy to give a definition of the term. They are used for the purpose of grinding and pulverising grain and other matters, to extract the juices of vegetables, to make various articles of manufacture. They take their names from the uses to which they are employed, hence we have paper-mills, fulling-mills, iron-mills, oil-mills, saw-mills, &c. In another respect their kinds are various; they are either fixed to the freehold or not. Those which are a part of the freehold, are either watermills, wind-mills, steam- mills, &c.; those which are not so fixed, are hand-mills, and are merely personal property. Those which are fixed, and make a part of the freehold, are buildings with machinery calculated to obtain the object proposed in their erection.
     2. It has been held that the grant of a mill; and its appurtenances, even without the land, carries the whole right of water enjoyed by the grantor, as necessary to its use, and as a necessary incident. Cro. Jac. 121, And a devise of a mill carries the land used with it, and the right to use the water. 1 Serg. & Rawle, 169; and see 5 Serg. & Rawle, 107; 2 Caine's Ca. 87; 10 Serg. & Rawle, 63; 1 Penna. R. 402; 3 N. H. Rep. 190; 6 Greenl. R. 436; Id. 154; 7 Mass. Rep. 6; 5 Shepl. 281.
     3. A mill means not merely the building, in which the business is carried on, but includes the site, the dam, and other things annexed to the freehold, necessary for its beneficial enjoyment. 3 Mass R. 280. See Vide 6 Greenl. R. 436.
     4. Whether manufacturing machinery will pass under the grant of a mill must depend mainly on the circumstances of each case. 5 Eng. C. L. R. 168; S. C. 1 Brod. & Bing. 506. In England the law appears not to be settled. 1 Bell's Com. 754, note 4, 5th ed. In this note are given the opinions of Sir Samuel Romily and Mr. Leech, on a question whether a mortgage of a piece of land on which a mill was erected, would operate as a mortgage of the machinery. Sir Samuel was clearly of opinion that such a mortgage would bind the machinery, and Mr. Leech was of a directly opposite opinion.
     5. The American law on this subject, appears not to be entirely fixed. 1 Hill. Ab. 16; 1 Bailey's R. 540; 3 Kent, Com. 440; see Amos & Fer., on Fixt., 188, et seq.; 1 Atk. 165; 1 Ves. 348; Sugd. Vend. 30; 6 John. 5; 10 Serg. & Rawle, 63; 2 Watts & Serg. 116; 6 Greenl. 157; 20 Wend. 636; 1 H. Bl. 259, note; 17 S. & R. 415; 10 Amer. Jur. 58; 1 Misso. R. 620; 3 Mason, 464; 2 Watts & S. 390. Vide 15 Vin. Ab. 398; Dane's Ab. Index, h.t. 6 Cowen, 677.

MILL, money. An imaginary money, of which ten are equal to one cent, one hundred equal to a dime, and one thousand equal to a dollar. There is no coin of this denomination. Vide Coin; Money.

References in classic literature ?
So the Miller tied the sails of the windmill together with a strong iron chain, and went down the hill with the basket on his arm.
We often talked of you during the winter, Hans,' said the Miller,
I give you all thanks," said the Miller, "but my bag is none that heavy that I cannot carry it e'en by myself.
cried the Miller, throwing up his elbow as though he feared the blow.
I can do it with whistles", Skiff Miller said proudly.
I nearly ate him once, over on Little Fish River," Miller volunteered grimly.
And yet was he to accuse Miss Daisy Miller of actual or potential inconduite, as they said at Geneva?
Mrs Miller made no answer; and Nancy, to whom her mother had whispered the generosity of Jones, turned pale upon the occasion; though, if either of them was angry with Nightingale, it was surely without reason.
The meal over, prayers were read by Miss Miller, and the classes filed off, two and two, upstairs.
Long they fought equally, until the Miller began to lose temper at finding himself so stoutly opposed, and at hearing the laughter of his companions, who, as usual in such cases, enjoyed his vexation.
So the boy throve and grew big, and in the meantime all prospered with the miller, and in a few years he was richer than he had ever been before.
To all this Miller replied abruptly, that it was useless to argue with him, as his mind was made up.