mine


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MINE. An excavation made for obtaining minerals from the bowels of the earth, and the minerals themselves are known by the name of mine.
     2. Mines are therefore considered as open and not open. An open mine is one at which work has been done, and a part of the materials taken out. When land is let on which there is an open mine, the tenant may, unless restricted by his lease, work the mine; 1 Cru. Dig. 132; 5 Co. R. 12; 1 Chit. Pr. 184, 5; and he may open new pit's or shafts for working the old vein, for otherwise the working of the same mine might be impracticable. 2 P. Wms. 388; 3 Tho. Co. Litt. 237; 10 Pick. R. 460. A mine not opened, cannot be opened by a tenant for years unless authorized, nor even by a tenant for life, without being guilty of waste. 5 Co. 12.
     3. Unless expressly excepted, mines would be included in the conveyance of land, without being expressly named, and so vice versa, by a grant of a mine, the land itself, the surface above the mine, if livery be made, will pass. Co. Litt. 6; 1 Tho. Co. Litt. 218; Shep. To. 26. Vide, generally, 15 Vin. Ab. 401; 2 Supp. to Ves. jr. 257, and the cases there cited, and 448; Com. Dig. Grant, G 7; Id. Waifs, H. 1; Crabb, R. P. Sec. 98-101; 10 East, 273; 1 M. & S. 84; 2 B. & A. 554; 4 Watts, 223-246.
     4. In New York the following provisions have been made in relation to the mines in that state, by the revised statutes, part 1, chapter 9, title 11. It is enacted as follows, by
     Sec. 1. The following mines are, and shall be, the property of this state, in its right of sovereignty. 1. All mines of gold and silver discovered, or hereafter to be discovered, within this state. 2. All mines of other metals discovered, or hereafter to be discovered, upon any lands owned by persons not being citizens of any of the United States. 3. All mines of other metals discovered, or hereafter to be discovered, upon lands owned by a citizen of any of the United States, the ore of which, upon an average, shall contain less than two equal third parts in value, of copper, tin, iron or lead, or any of those metals.
     6.-Sec. 2. All mines, and all minerals and fossils discovered, or hereafter to be discovered, upon any lands belonging to the people of this state, are, and shall be the property of the people, subject to the provisions hereinafter made to encourage the discovery thereof.
     6.-Sec. 3. All mines of whatever description, other than mines of gold and silver, discovered or hereafter to be discovered, upon any lauds owned by a citizen of the United states, the ore of which, upon an average, shall contain two equal third parts or more, in value, of copper, tin, iron and lead, or any of those metals, shall belong to the owner of such land.
     7.-Sec. 4. Every person who shall make a discovery of any mine of gold or silver, within this state, and the executors, administrators or assigns of such person, shall be exempted from paying to the people of this state, any part of the ore, profit or produce of such mine, for the term of twenty-one years, to be computed from the time of giving notice of such discovery, in the manner hereinafter directed.
     8.-Sec. 5. No person discovering a mine of gold or silver within this state, shall work the same, until he give notice thereof, by information in writing, to the secretary of this state, describing particularly therein the nature and situation of the mine. Such notice shall be registered in a book, to be kept the secretary for that purpose.
     9.-Sec. 6. After the expiration of the term above specified, the discoverer of the mine, or his representatives, shall be preferred in any contract for the working of such mine, made with the legislature or under its authority.
    10.-Sec. 7. Nothing in this title contained shall affect any grants heretofore made by the legislature, to persons having discovered mines; nor be construed to give to any person a right to enter on, or to break up the lands of any other person, or of the people of this state, or to work any mines in such lands, unless the consent, in writing, of the owner thereof, or of the commissioners of the land office, when the lands belong to the people of this state, shall be previously obtained.

References in classic literature ?
It seemed not so wild a dream -- old as I was, and sombre as I was, and misshapen as I was -- that the simple bliss, which is scattered far and wide, for all mankind to gather up, might yet be mine.
Presently after I will appear in mine own shape, play the courteous knight, rescue the unfortunate and afflicted fair one from the hands of the rude ravishers, conduct her to Front-de-B
loose the falling midnight of your hair, And in those stars, your eyes, let me behold Mine image, as in mirrors.
and, reasoning from analogy, as you say, if there be mines in South America, ought there not to be mines in North America too?
In the morning I took a four-wheel cab and drove straight to Harley Street; and, upon my soul, as I stood on the specialist's door-step, I could have sworn I saw the occupant of the room next mine dash by me in a hansom!
I dare say he was glad of mine, for he was otherwise quite alone in the village, or had no companionship outside of his own family.
I presume you will send out an expert to the mine first?
They were old friends of mine, enemies rather, that peopled my nights with fear.
And the strangest thing about it is that all religions are erroneous and mischievous excepting mine.
My host the superintendent of the mine, was a shrewd but rather ignorant Cornish miner.
But before I show you mine, I want to see yours, dear Pinocchio.
To my friends can I again go down, and also to mine enemies