mine

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MINE. An excavation made for obtaining minerals from the bowels of the earth, and the minerals themselves are known by the name of mine.
     2. Mines are therefore considered as open and not open. An open mine is one at which work has been done, and a part of the materials taken out. When land is let on which there is an open mine, the tenant may, unless restricted by his lease, work the mine; 1 Cru. Dig. 132; 5 Co. R. 12; 1 Chit. Pr. 184, 5; and he may open new pit's or shafts for working the old vein, for otherwise the working of the same mine might be impracticable. 2 P. Wms. 388; 3 Tho. Co. Litt. 237; 10 Pick. R. 460. A mine not opened, cannot be opened by a tenant for years unless authorized, nor even by a tenant for life, without being guilty of waste. 5 Co. 12.
     3. Unless expressly excepted, mines would be included in the conveyance of land, without being expressly named, and so vice versa, by a grant of a mine, the land itself, the surface above the mine, if livery be made, will pass. Co. Litt. 6; 1 Tho. Co. Litt. 218; Shep. To. 26. Vide, generally, 15 Vin. Ab. 401; 2 Supp. to Ves. jr. 257, and the cases there cited, and 448; Com. Dig. Grant, G 7; Id. Waifs, H. 1; Crabb, R. P. Sec. 98-101; 10 East, 273; 1 M. & S. 84; 2 B. & A. 554; 4 Watts, 223-246.
     4. In New York the following provisions have been made in relation to the mines in that state, by the revised statutes, part 1, chapter 9, title 11. It is enacted as follows, by
     Sec. 1. The following mines are, and shall be, the property of this state, in its right of sovereignty. 1. All mines of gold and silver discovered, or hereafter to be discovered, within this state. 2. All mines of other metals discovered, or hereafter to be discovered, upon any lands owned by persons not being citizens of any of the United States. 3. All mines of other metals discovered, or hereafter to be discovered, upon lands owned by a citizen of any of the United States, the ore of which, upon an average, shall contain less than two equal third parts in value, of copper, tin, iron or lead, or any of those metals.
     6.-Sec. 2. All mines, and all minerals and fossils discovered, or hereafter to be discovered, upon any lands belonging to the people of this state, are, and shall be the property of the people, subject to the provisions hereinafter made to encourage the discovery thereof.
     6.-Sec. 3. All mines of whatever description, other than mines of gold and silver, discovered or hereafter to be discovered, upon any lauds owned by a citizen of the United states, the ore of which, upon an average, shall contain two equal third parts or more, in value, of copper, tin, iron and lead, or any of those metals, shall belong to the owner of such land.
     7.-Sec. 4. Every person who shall make a discovery of any mine of gold or silver, within this state, and the executors, administrators or assigns of such person, shall be exempted from paying to the people of this state, any part of the ore, profit or produce of such mine, for the term of twenty-one years, to be computed from the time of giving notice of such discovery, in the manner hereinafter directed.
     8.-Sec. 5. No person discovering a mine of gold or silver within this state, shall work the same, until he give notice thereof, by information in writing, to the secretary of this state, describing particularly therein the nature and situation of the mine. Such notice shall be registered in a book, to be kept the secretary for that purpose.
     9.-Sec. 6. After the expiration of the term above specified, the discoverer of the mine, or his representatives, shall be preferred in any contract for the working of such mine, made with the legislature or under its authority.
    10.-Sec. 7. Nothing in this title contained shall affect any grants heretofore made by the legislature, to persons having discovered mines; nor be construed to give to any person a right to enter on, or to break up the lands of any other person, or of the people of this state, or to work any mines in such lands, unless the consent, in writing, of the owner thereof, or of the commissioners of the land office, when the lands belong to the people of this state, shall be previously obtained.

References in periodicals archive ?
Originally, many of the minefields were laid rapidly under the imminent enemy threat of invasion and, although records were kept as carefully as possible at the time, they had remained imperfect.
Vega used himself as a buffer and drove his own vehicle through the minefield ahead of the vehicle carrying both the wounded soldiers, and the medics who were taking turns giving CPR to the most grievously injured soldiers.
Despite years of effort to dig up mines planted during decades of civil war and Soviet occupation, more than 650 square kilometres of Afghan territory are still considered active minefields.
For more than an hour, an eyewitness to the tragedy shouted in Arabic to=20 Agabriya, who lay wounded in the minefield.
A mine went off and they realised they had run into a minefield, probably put there by Soviet troops during their invasion in the early 1980s.
We were looking for sub-munitions (small bombs) but unfortunately I found a minefield.
Vladimir Gerasimov,a spokesman for the Emer-gency Situations Ministry, said the officer in the truck and servicemen who tried to stop him were killed when the truck smashed the gate and drove into the minefield around the base.
The system used by the Coalition Forces Land Component Command (CFLCC) engineer staff section (C7) was the Tactical Minefield Database (TMFDB) System prototype, which gave engineers a way to track and disseminate explosive hazards information on the battlefield.
Over the past five years, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)--the central research and development organization for the Department of Defense--has developed and tested the concept of a self-healing minefield system.
With careful attention to the legal and regulatory processes involved, a potential buyer of a nursing home can escape the feeling of tiptoeing through a minefield and instead enjoy a cakewalk.
DeSouza strayed into this minefield on his own and responded without checking with real experts on the subject.
Within weeks of receiving the tasking, NGIC established a dynamic web-based mapping service through which they disseminated minefield locations to the Intelligence Community (IC) using geographic information system (GIS) technology.