minimum

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minimum

noun bit, dash, drop, fragment, iota, jot, least amount, least part, least quantity, lowest quantity, minim, modicum, morsel, mote, pars minima, particle, piece, quorum, scantling, scintilla, shade, sliver, small amount, small quantity, sprinkling, sufficiency, sufficient amount, tincture, tinge, tittle, touch, trace, whit
Associated concepts: minimum age, minimum charge, minnmum fee schedule, minimum price, minimum wage
See also: minimal, minor, modicum, nominal, paucity
References in periodicals archive ?
The FTC found that NTSP engaged in the unlawful negotiation of agreements on price and other terms, refused to deal with payers except on collectively agreed-upon terms, and refused to submit payer offers to its physicians unless the terms complied with NTSP's minimum fee schedule.
"Offenders sentenced in the Todd court had a recidivism rate that was about one-half that of offenders sentenced in neighboring jurisdictions where minimum sanctions were imposed." (The article implies that the most common reason for minimum sanctions in the nearby jurisdictions is prison overcrowding.)
"At the time, we didn't know what a mandatory minimum was," Bill Boman, Taylor's 74-year-old cousin, told JS.
Mandatory minimum sentences grew out of the War on Drugs in the 1980s.
In 2002, Michigan ended mandatory minimum sentencing.
Critics question the effectiveness of mandatory minimum sentences.
His decision to oppose mandatory minimums came around the same time as a shift in his rhetoric regarding drug offenders.
Among other things, he recommended abolition of mandatory minimums, reform of the federal sentencing guidelines, release of nonviolent drug offenders, and an end to the federalization of crime policy.
DiIulio followed that up with a May 17 National Review article making "a conservative crime-control case" for repealing mandatory minimums. "To continue to imprison drug-only offenders mandatorily," he wrote, "is to hamstring further a justice system that controls crime in a daily war of inches, not miles, and that has among its main beneficiaries low-income urban dwellers." He explains: "I view the criminal justice system as a sorting machine.
The federal minimum for teens is 90 cents an hour less for the first 90 days on the job than the regular minimum wage.
How much below that line would such a family be if they earned Alaska's minimum wage?
The buying power of the minimum wage differs from place to place because of differences in the cost of living.