misdemeanant


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See: convict, criminal, culpable, delinquent, lawbreaker, malefactor, wrongdoer

misdemeanant

a person who has committed or been convicted of a MISDEMEANOUR.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider the framing-era limitation on the right to bear arms to loyal white males, the nineteenth-century prohibitions on carrying concealed firearms, and the more recent prohibitions on the possession of firearms by convicted felons and dangerous misdemeanants discussed in Part II above.
In addition to addressing the domestic violence misdemeanant problem presented in Part II, this Part will also apply the proposed framework to criminal laws affecting the possession of firearms in public housing projects (such as those just litigated in Delaware (168)) and concealed-carry provisions.
Finally, this section considers possible rationales for the Amendment's apparent disparate treatment between domestic violence misdemeanants and felons.
estimate they will need 640 beds for misdemeanant offenders over the next 20 years.
Indeed, in 1972 when the Supreme Court insisted on the right to counsel for misdemeanants, it was motivated to do so in part to counter the aggregating tendencies of mass misdemeanor processing, where "[s]uddenly it becomes clear that for most defendants in the criminal process, there is scant regard for them as individuals.
MAXIMUS (NYSE:MMS) announces the acquisition of National Misdemeanant Private Probation Operations (NMPPO).
Likewise, a prosecutor may not "up the ante'" by filing felony charges when a convicted misdemeanant exercises his statutory appellate right to trial de novo.
Some inmates are exempted from the requirements, including those serving time for misdemeanant convictions in Alaska; those with medical, mental health, discipline and/or attitude issues in Colorado; those sentenced to less than 120 days in Washington, D.
2010) (upholding a federal ban on firearm possession by individuals convicted of domestic violence misdemeanors, based on analysis of Heller and analysis of the history behind felon and misdemeanant possession laws); United States v.
They allow large firms to maintain the appearance of a misdemeanant, claim to have been shamed, agree to restore the harm to all victims, and avoid the strictures of vicarious liability--liability rules that are now reserved for small entities where strict liability seems logical, if not reasonable.
Staff were informed that misdemeanant arrestees were purposely getting arrested and smuggling drugs to friends who were already in jail.
His counsel contended that the right to take the fingerprints did not exist, because of the absence of a state or federal statute providing for it, and because fingerprinting subjected "a possible misdemeanant before trial and conviction" to "unnecessary indignity," and constituted a violation of his constitutional rights.