misdemeanant


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See: convict, criminal, culpable, delinquent, lawbreaker, malefactor, wrongdoer

misdemeanant

a person who has committed or been convicted of a MISDEMEANOUR.
References in periodicals archive ?
747, 817-18 (2005) (noting that charge of gun possession by convicted domestic violence misdemeanant is easier to prove that charge of domestic assault).
that matter, from serial quality-of-life misdemeanants. (145)
Previous commentary on the Amendment typically praised the Amendment for prohibiting domestic violence misdemeanants in the military from possessing firearms.(17) However, no commentary to date has noted the important distinction between the personal weapons of military personnel, which the Government Exception never applied to, and those weapons issued by the military for military purposes, which the Government Exception used to exempt but no longer does.(18) This article recognizes this difference and accepts arguendo the validity of preventing domestic violence misdemeanants in the military from possessing personal weapons, but argues that there is no justification for preventing Army personnel from possessing Army-issued weapons to perform official duties.
Experts can also testify that the experience of most police agencies is that the fleeing vehicle is usually driven by a traffic offender or misdemeanant who is irrationally afraid of being stopped.
(93.) A "persistent misdemeanant" was defined as a defendant with an adult criminal record with two or more prosecuted arrests in the previous year, at least one of which must have had a top arrest charge of misdemeanor severity.
misdemeanant could have his civil rights restored, this would not
In Gamer, the Court noted that at common law, deadly force was permissible in the apprehension of a felon but was condemned as disproportionately severe when used to apprehend a misdemeanant. Id.
contradiction to its earlier conclusion) that a right of misdemeanant
[section] 925(a)(1), (45) the so-called "Government Exception," (46) which exempts government employees from federal firearm restrictions that impinge on their governmental duties, applies to abusers subject to orders of protection but not to misdemeanant abusers.
An early experiment, conducted in Baltimore in the spring of 1998, involved twelve law students supervised by Colbert who represented non-violent misdemeanant clients--meeting with them both prior to and at the proceeding--and whose representation yielded either release on recognizance or reduced (and affordable) bond for seventy percent of those represented.
The average length of stay of the current misdemeanant acquittees in the custody of DMHMRSAS is 7.2 years.