misdemeanant

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misdemeanant

a person who has committed or been convicted of a MISDEMEANOUR.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
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35, 36 (1972) (noting that "[m]isdemeanants represented by attorneys are five times as likely to emerge from police court with all charges dismissed as are defendants who face similar charges without counsel") (citing AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION, LEGAL COUNSEL FOR MISDEMEANANTS, PRELIMINARY REPORT 1 (1970)); see also Brewer v.
The female population consists of inmates ranging from pretrial misdemeanants to convicted felons.
recommend to a defendant acceptance of a plea unless appropriate investigation and study of the case has been completed." (85) At the same time, the severity of the penalties to which even misdemeanants are now exposed lends constitutional force to policy arguments that clients charged with minor crimes should not be compelled to plead as a condition of release.
(1990) report slightly different findings, noting that 18 percent of misdemeanant probationers and 52 percent of felony probationers were assessed a fine.
In fiscal year 1996, the intake staff assessed more than 6,000 misdemeanants and coordinated the release of almost 5,000 of them.
(11.) As discussed in Part III.A, infra, there are no data on state court misdemeanants that would permit this sort of analysis, so the data are limited to federal court misdemeanants.
PENAL LAW [section] 60.35(1)(b)-(c) (McKinney 2004) (requiring a mandatory surcharge for a defendant convicted of a violation of $75 and a crime victim assistance fee of $20; further requiring a surcharge for a misdemeanant of $140 and a crime victim assistance fee of $20).
Retired military bases may have buildings that are suitable for housing misdemeanants, work release or education release inmates.
Developing a treatment court for misdemeanants, therefore, tests the model of coercive treatment insofar as the heavy hammer of jail time, traditionally thought to be the main motivating element for compliance, no longer is as significant a factor.
In the 17th century, Europeans began holding in prisons persons convicted as debtors, misdemeanants and felons.
You've got two felony courts, one misdemeanor court, and it is the misdemeanants who are actually using drugs, reporting the most serious drug use.