misdemeanant

(redirected from misdemeanants)
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See: convict, criminal, culpable, delinquent, lawbreaker, malefactor, wrongdoer

misdemeanant

a person who has committed or been convicted of a MISDEMEANOUR.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lawyers, Minor Crimes, Massive Waste: The Terrible Toll of America's Broken Misdemeanor Courts 7 (2009) ("JTJaxpayers expend on average $80 per inmate per day to lock up misdemeanants.
Paul is located: misdemeanants who went through the usual criminal process were two and a half times more likely to be convicted in their first year in the community and served almost five times as many days in jail in that period compared with MHC completers.
Because domestic violence misdemeanants and persons subject to a
1(2) (2013) (providing that all aggravated misdemeanants sentenced to a term of incarceration greater than one year shall serve indeterminate sentences), available at https://www.
When Senator Lautenberg first sought to disarm convicted domestic violence misdemeanants nearly twenty years ago, his purpose was clear: to decrease the grave risk that batterers with guns will kill their victims.
The male inmates are divided by category, whether they be pretrial felony suspects, sentenced misdemeanants or sentenced felons awaiting transfer to the state's prison system.
But if it is sufficient for the government to show some evidence that there was a general sense in early America that particularly dangerous types of individuals should not have unqualified rights to be armed with weapons, the government can easily do that and the modern laws barring possession of guns by domestic violence misdemeanants can be upheld.
Sarah Geraghty and Melanie Velez provide other examples of such enrichment: In South Georgia, Clinch County court officials had charged state court misdemeanants $10-15 in illegal fees, which were pocketed by court personnel.
The Misdemeanor Deferred Prosecution Program (MDPP) was launched in 2012 in response to challenges faced by non-violent misdemeanants who end up with convictions.
By increasing punishment gradually and preventing recidivist misdemeanants from crossing the misdemeanor-felony border as quickly, Alaska could secure the benefits of recidivism statutes while avoiding the constitutional and prudential concerns present in existing law.
which even misdemeanants are now exposed lends constitutional force
Under the common law fleeing felon rule, both law enforcement officers and private citizens enjoyed the privilege of using deadly force to secure the arrest of felons, but neither could use the privilege to secure the arrest of misdemeanants.