misgovernment


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When out of disgust with misgovernment terrorists do arise, one would expect them to strike, in the first place, their own hated regime.
Talbot, alarmed at the level of the Awujale's misgovernment, supported the proposal.
(20) In particular, France, a monarchy, had to be assured that the American struggle was an attack, not on monarchy as such, but only on the British monarchy, for reasons arising out of its colonial misgovernment rather than out of an anti-monarchical principle.
After being evacuated from these last British beachheads, many would scratch an existence in Nova Scotia or battle disease and misgovernment in Sierra Leone; more than a thousand took their chances and did both.
Former Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori on Wednesday called Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's fiscal reform drive ''historic misgovernment'' in an interview with Kyodo News.
Fifteen years previously, Egyptian misgovernment had led to a successful rebellion in Sudan.
The anti-globalization movements and hysteria about boom and bust and corporate misgovernment could easily lead to the partial resumption of exchange control or limits on capital movements by some of the countries that abandoned them toward the end of the 20th century.
Emerson had the same view," he asserts, "but approached the subject with a proclamation of deeper principles, unshaken by any transient recession, Civil War, reconstruction, expansion, Imperialism,--any of the phases of misgovernment into which the masses are apt to fall at the push of wicked politicians." For Emerson, Sanborn noted, "'the arch-Abolitionist,--older than Brown, and older than the Shenandoah Mountains, is Love, whose other name is Justice.'" (33)
"Drought comes on top of gross misgovernment in lots of the countries."
Like Ponet, Buchanan grounds his argument on behalf of tyrannicide in natural law theory; Defending the right of a free people to resist tyranny or misgovernment requires, logically, an exposition of good government, "the original and cause of creating kings, and what the duties of kings are towards their people, and of people towards their kings" (7).
Misgovernment is of four kinds, often in combination.
And so, in utter contrast to their neighbors in Korea, the Taiwanese have looked upon their experience with Japan as a reasonably tolerable and efficacious interlude between ineffectual Qing Dynasty rule and rapacious KMT misgovernment. As late as 1970 a US political scientist sojourning in Taiwan found nostalgia for the Japanese era and contempt for Chiang Kai-shek's rule at every turn.