mishap

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Related to mishaps: expedite, misfortune, inevitability
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Included are all Navy and Marine Corps aviation Class A, B and C mishaps, where an aviation maintenance person ("who" factor) or maintenance action ("what" factor) was included as an involved factor in a safety investigation report (SIR).
So why did we not follow our procedures in many of these mishaps? Some might argue operational pressures or chasing readiness requirements are causing folks to cut corners.
This is the first installment of a four-part series that will explore non- military aviation mishaps. In the first three articles, we'll dissect what went wrong and why in three separate case studies of famous or significant mishaps from the past (some of which you may have heard about).
[check] First Flag notification requirements for Class A mishaps
So, if the aircraft are different but the incidents of maintenance-induced mishaps are relatively similar, what is the common mishap denominator?
THE FOLLOWING LANGUAGE WILL BE ADDED TO THE NEXT REVISION OF REF B; "MISHAPS INVOLVING INJURED PERSONNEL WHO ARE SUBSEQUENTLY TRANSFERRED OR TEMPORAILY ASSIGNED TO A MEDHOLD OR TPU WILL BE REPORTED BY THE COMMAND THAT WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INDIVIDUAL AT THE TIME THE MISHAP OCCURRED.
The Web-Enabled Safety System (WESS), with complete, on-line mishap reporting and data retrieval for non-aviation mishaps, went "live" July 12, 2004.
Foreign objects have been a nuisance contributor to mishaps involving powered flight since Orville Wright hit a bird while flying circles over a field near Dayton, Ohio.
We also have a bin where we place flight mishaps that had an initial aircraft component failure, because of maintenance malpractice or a material failure that is followed by an aircrew causal factor or factors.
Data: We studied three years' worth of off-duty mishaps (Class A, B and C), categorized as stages of the deployment cycle.
From March 2, 2009, to June 1, 2009, the Navy and Marine Corps had 40 Class C mishaps involving aircraft--a 37 percent increase from the same period in 2008.
A year ago, the Secretary of Defense issued a challenge to reduce the number of mishaps and accident rates by at least half within two years.