References in classic literature ?
"I refuse to accept this extraordinary mission," Pailleton declared, rising to his feet.
"No, Monsieur: I accepted my mission in good faith.
Neither public nor private influences produce the slightest effect on us, when we have once got our mission. Taxation may be the consequence of a mission; riots may be the consequence of a mission; wars may be the consequence of a mission: we go on with our work, irrespective of every human consideration which moves the world outside us.
"He is now working--in other words, he is now deliberately risking his life--in the Mission to Green Anchor Fields.
I wish success to your mission," and with his embroidered red mantle, his flowing feathers, and his glittering ornaments, he rejoined his suite who were respectfully awaiting him.
When they would thrust at, or parry, the noses of his champing horses, making them swing their heads and move their feet, disturbing a solid dreamy repose, he swore at the men as fools, for he himself could perceive that Providence had caused it clearly to be written, that he and his team had the unalienable right to stand in the proper path of the sun chariot, and if they so minded, obstruct its mission or take a wheel off.
Now let us return to the mission with which you wish to charge me; and as I desire to continue to merit the confidence of your Eminence, deign to unfold it to me in terms clear and precise, that I may not commit an error."
The Conservative candidate had announced his intention of addressing a meeting at Blackstable; and Josiah Graves, having arranged that it should take place in the Mission Hall, went to Mr.
At the period of which I am now writing, the home government had decided on sending a special diplomatic mission to one of the native princes ruling over a remote province of our Indian empire.
Fentolin," he added, with the air of one making a last effort to preserve his temper, "the mission with which I am charged is one of greater importance than you can imagine.
Plan of the Salt Lake expedition Great sandy deserts Sufferings from thirst Ogden's River Trails and smoke of lurking savages Thefts at night A trapper's revenge Alarms of a guilty conscience A murderous victory Californian mountains Plains along the Pacific Arrival at Monterey Account of the place and neighborhood Lower California Its extent The Peninsula Soil Climate Production Its settlements by the Jesuits Their sway over the Indians Their expulsion Ruins of a missionary establishment Sublime scenery Upper California Missions Their power and policy Resources of the country Designs of foreign nations
The Protestant Missions appear to have despaired of reclaiming these islands from heathenism.

Full browser ?