moot

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Moot

An issue presenting no real controversy.

Moot refers to a subject for academic argument. It is an abstract question that does not arise from existing facts or rights.

Moot court is a cocurricular or extracurricular activity in law school where students have the opportunity to write briefs and present oral arguments on hypothetical cases.

moot

adj. 1) unsettled, open to argument, or debatable, specifically about a legal question which has not been determined by any decision of any court. 2) an issue only of academic interest. (See: moot point, moot court)

moot

an old English word for an assembly, but now the word is used only
1 as a noun to describe a legal argument not in a court of law, usually held for the purpose of legal education based on a tradition established in the English Inns of Court.
2 as an adjective, a point of law is often said to be moot if, raised in a litigation, the point does not any longer affect the decision in the case before the court.

MOOT, English law. A term used in the inns of court, signifying the exercise of arguing imaginary cases, which young barristers and students used to perform at certain times, the better to be enabled by this practice to defend their clients cases. A moot question is one which has not been decided.

References in periodicals archive ?
Representing Aberystwyth University's Mooting Society will be third year undergraduates Jake Woodcock and Jake Moses.
One of those external competitions was the LexisNexis Welsh National Mooting Competition, in which Bangor beat teams from all over Wales to take first prize earlier this year.
Ms Mansfield, a graduate diploma of law student, said: "I am so proud we won the mooting finals.
The Oxford Mooting Contest is held annually and attracts law undergraduates from around 60 UK universities.
15, 2005) (noting that it is not uncommon for a former clerk sitting on a moot panel to have drafted an opinion central to the case he or she is mooting).
Delhi High Court judge Justice Rajiv Shakdher described mooting as a great idea since it imbibes structured process of thinking in budding lawyers, nurturing social skills in them by providing them with an opportunity to meet people from diverse cultures and ethnicities in a moot court and accommodates each other's' views.