mordant

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Indeed, it was odd to see an artist who has generally employed any material means necessary in his mordantly funny quest for the blindingly obvious--his oftrepeated message being, more or less, that we're all gonna die--turn to the most conventional medium of all.
Grim as much of content is, atmosphere is often mordantly comic, even during the most appalling incidents.
Indeed, it was odd to see an artist who has generally employed any material means necessary in his mordantly funny quest for the blindingly obvious--his oft-repeated message being, more or less, that we're all gonna die--turn to the most conventional medium of all.
These and other personal disasters are etched in set pieces that flirt with genuine horror at Big Brother totalitarianism but for the most part maintain a mordantly humorous tone.
Tsai, Yve-Alain Bois and Rosalind Krauss, Ann Reynolds, and I are overstating the case when we position Smithson as mordantly opposed to canonized, formalist modernism.
As the authorities close in, and he's arrested with a trunk containing murderous equipment, final act details the equally fantastic story of his incarceration, escape, more murders and final execution, shown in mordantly humorous detail.
Having mordantly demonstrated the masquerade of femininity as quite literally mediated through the lens of film, her pictures are now reprised by the fashion photographer Ellen von Unwerth for a 1995 Alberta Ferretti advertising campaign.
Its offerings ranged from costume epics like "The Ten Commandments" and "Samson and Delilah" to nuanced comedies defined by "the Lubitsch touch" to the mordantly witty Wilder works to the inspired lunacy of the Marx Brothers.
A comic cri de coeur for sensitive guys in a macho world, mordantly peppy pic is a contender for offshore hardtops.
The plunger's iconization is also, in the city of Venice, mordantly ironic--almost a cosmic memento mori.
From the mordantly dark "The Sweet Smell of Success," a 1957 film that went from cult fare to bona fide classic, to "Reefer Madness," a shrill, unintentionally campy cautionary tale from the `30s, to "Debbie Does Dallas," an X-rated hit released at a time when people actually consumed porn in movie houses, screen-to-stage musical adaptations seem to be ruled more by serendipity than anything else.