mores


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Thus, even after it was verified that Thomas Jefferson did more than write great documents at his slave-run Monticello, the majority of the nation's writers were quick to race to the icon's rescue, exhorting us to never forget the majestic democracy he and his fraternity designed.
Of what avail is any amount of well-being," Roepke wrote, "if at the same time, we steadily render the world more vulgar, uglier, noisier, and drearier and if men lose the moral and spiritual foundations of their existence?
Nellie McKay observes that between 1918 and 1930 "eleven black women published twenty-one plays between them, in comparison to no more than half a dozen [black] men who saw their works in print during these years" ("Theater" 625).
Actress Rhea Seehorn, who has a bit part in episode two, singularly shows more promise than this entire enterprise.
Traders, teachers, writers, shamans and doctors in effect select and filter the importation of commodities, technologies, ideas, and mores, facilitating their adaptation to local society.
Filmmakers Marion Lipschutz and Rose Rosenblatt introduce Shelby as a typical well-brought-up young lady who's more or less oblivious to the hypocritical mores of her hometown--where abstinence-only sex education in school and exhortations in church against premarital sex have failed to forestall rates of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases among the state's highest.
The Clay mores linebacker is only now finding his feet after a horror injury at the same stadium cruelly cut his season short last May.
At the outset of the American Civil War, Ada Monroe mores to the isolated town of Cold Mountain in North Carolina, where she meets the shy and silent Inman, the hero of the book.
and knowledge" taught in the service of the Church, and the College's recent concessions to certain pressure groups lobbying to redefine it along secular mores.
Rutland skillfully weaves two tales--the story of a marriage and the racial shaking of American society during the latter half of the 20th century--brilliantly examining changes in women's roles and social mores, as the couple's lives are played out against a timeline of American history.
Gilmore's case is the entry point into a wider discussion of the future of privacy; a concept which is constantly being redefined as governmental edicts, technological capabilities, business practices, and social mores evolve.