motion in limine


Also found in: Wikipedia.

motion in limine

(limb-in-nay) n. from Latin for "threshold," a motion made at the start of a trial requesting that the judge rule that certain evidence may not be introduced in trial. This is most common in criminal trials where evidence is subject to constitutional limitations, such as statements made without the Miranda warnings (reading their rights). (See: Miranda warning, motion, in limine)

References in periodicals archive ?
The defendants in return filed a motion in limine, asking the court to prohibit the discussion of MySpace and YouTube, claiming the screenshots of archived web pages provided into evidence amount to hearsay.
filed their motion in limine. Defendants claim that plaintiff Clarence Edward Whitaker intends to seek damages for: (1) Mrs.
Plaintiffs Motion in Limine Concerning Evidence Related to Class Members Personal Resources and Income (ECF No.
Before the trial, DOT made a motion in limine, requesting that the trial court instruct all parties, counsel, and witnesses not to mention certain information in the presence of the jury.
Where a plaintiff filed a motion in limine and sought to compel deposition answers in a property case against his brother, the motion to compel is denied because he did not identify the questions he intended to ask, and the motion in limine is denied because the evidence he sought to bar was not necessarily prohibited by the best evidence rule or statue of frauds.
Burton now appeals, arguing that the district court erred in its order on the motion in limine by disallowing the evidence of her 2008 encounter with Officer Richardt.
* Motions in Limine--A motion in limine is "any motion, whether made before or during trial, to exclude anticipated prejudicial evidence before the evidence is actually offered." (9) The exclusion of inadmissible or unfairly prejudicial evidence and arguments prior to trial, as opposed to objections upon their introduction, can help prevent an opponent from tainting a jury.
Petersen, who serves on the Federal Election Commission, had difficulty answering questions about the "Daubert standard," which has to do with expert witness testimony, and the definition of a "motion in limine," which has to do with the introduction of evidence.
It also criticized the use of a motion in limine (to limit testimony allowed at trial) when it had the effect of a motion for summary judgment without the protections of a motion for summary judgment.
However, it is crucial to know, under the particular jurisdiction's rules and case law, whether a ruling on a motion in limine preserves the objection to the evidence -- in some jurisdictions it does not, and counsel must object at the time the evidence is offered or the issue will be considered waived for purposes of appeal.
Liberty then tiled a motion in limine seeking to compel arbitration based on the arbitration clause in the contract.