References in periodicals archive ?
Some contributions were obtrusive instead of complementary, others, not least the pastel flutes, brought Bach's vision movingly to life.
The poem "daddy's song" movingly features conversation with Hammad's working-class immigrant father.
And then the years started flying by and we discovered ourself reading books by people with names like Hemingway, Verne, Steinbeck, Wells, Maugham, and others who could write so eloquently and movingly.
Lawrence, the author of The Wreckers, Lord of the Nutcracker Men, and other novels for YAs, writes evocatively and movingly about Kak's experiences.
Much of the evidence for Long's arguments come from legal cases, in which citizens grappling with issues of gender, respectability, race and commercial sexuality openly expressed their views, and, in some cases, movingly recounted their experiences and relationships.
So, for all its seriousness and well-choreographed historicism, Antin's work is funny and movingly, messily human.
If soldiers on a battlefield suffer, there is a quieter, less evident suffering that happens behind the front lines, and this memoir reveals, painfully and movingly, the no less violent and scarring battles that happen there.
He films ruined cities, anguished faces, beatific Buddhas, sinister skies, lambent rivers at dawn and at twilight, grinning children, passing trains at night, airplanes cutting through the cloudy firmament, birds leaving the bare, blasted branches of trees and flapping off into the sky in slow motion--all of these far too well--trod cinematic moments--superbly, movingly, somehow endlessly evading the cliches in which his script so fulsomely trades.
Walda Blow, an Aboriginal Australian, spoke movingly of the history of her people at the hands of White Australia, 'I am not bitter,' she said.
Cervantes also writes movingly in Marcus Garvey: Black Nationalist (1931798141, $21.95), providing a fine biographical survey of the politics and life of Garvey.
The clever gimmicks littering Saburo Teshigawara's Luminous, for his company KARAS, were swept away for an extended finale that movingly contrasted the liquid yet cutting Japanese dancer-choreographer and the young, avid, and blind British dancer Stuart Jackson.
Laura Gowing writes movingly about the plight of pregnant women driven from one village to another as their neighbors attempted to avoid the charges of maintaining an illegitimate child born within their parish boundaries, while Ingram shows that charges of sexual abuse involved mainly girls, not boys, and focused on young children between the ages of five and nine.