carrier

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carrier

n. in general, any person or business which transports property or people by any means of conveyance (truck, auto, taxi, bus, airplane, railroad, ship), almost always for a charge. The carrier is the transportation system and not the owner or operator of the system. There are two types of carriers: common carrier (in the regular business or a public utility of transportation) and a private carrier (a party not in the business, but agrees to make a delivery or carry a passenger in a specific instance). Regular transportation systems are regulated by states and by the Interstate Commerce Commission if they cross state lines. (See: common carrier, private carrier)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

carrier

see COMMON CARRIER, CARRIAGE BY ROAD.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
This section discusses the current multiplexing methods of WMNs.
Different general approaches of packet multiplexing methods over WMNs are available.
This approach performs packet multiplexing/de-multiplexing and enforces multiplexing delay at all hops throughout the route between source and destination.
From a multiplexing standpoint, these work quite well, as the only requirement is that the amplicons be of distinguishable sizes.
The advantages of this method are that it is amenable to automation and extremely high levels of multiplexing; arrays the size of a postage stamp can contain hundreds of thousands of unique spots, or even more.
This new and emerging technology is redefining multiplexing by fully exploiting the number of analytes that can be detected in a single reaction, using current, real-time instrumentation.
Cisco's remote IP statistical multiplexing technology, operating in conjunction with the digital content manager and its D9032 MPEG-2 encoders, now multiplexes the two broadcasters' signals from different locations.
One of the MPEG-4 multiplexes contains HD and SD content in a single statistical multiplexing pool, enabling dynamic allocation of bandwidth to either type of content.
The flood of multiplexing has actually led to increased demand, resulting in huge increases in film-going.
EGV's multiplexing projects have been aimed at shopping centers.
European worries that multiplexing would benefit only American movies have not been dispelled, but there is growing evidence that the plexes are also boosting local fare.
blockbusters, initial findings from the Centre National de la Cinematographie suggest that the biggest beneficiaries of multiplexing have been French and European films.