mute

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Related to muteness: Apraxia of Speech

mute

adjective close-lipped, closemouthed, dumb, hushed, inarticulate, incapable of speech, incommunicative, indisposed to talk, noiseless, pauciloquent, quiet, refraining from utterance, reserved, reticent, silent, soundless, speechless, still, taciturn, tight-lipped, tongue-tied, unable to speak, unable to utter articulate sound, uncommunicative, unexpressive, unloquacious, untalkative, unvocal, unvocalizing, voiceless, wordless
See also: inarticulate, moderate, repress, speechless, stifle, subdue, taciturn, unresponsive

mute

a person arraigned on indictment who refuses to answer a charge.

MUTE, persons. One who is dumb. Vide Deaf and Dumb.

MUTE, STANDING MUTE, practice, crim. law. When a prisoner upon his arraignment totally refuses to answer, insists upon mere frivolous pretences, or refuses to put himself upon the country, after pleading not guilty, he is said to stand mute.
     2. In the case of the United States v. Hare, et al., Circuit Court, Maryland Dist. May sess. 1818, the prisoner standing mute was considered as if he had pleaded not guilty.
     3. The act of congress of March 3, 1825, 3 Story's L. U. S. 2002, has since provided as follows; Sec. 14, That if any person, upon his or her arraignment upon any indictment before any court of the United States for any offence, not capital, shall stand mute, or will not answer or plead to such indictment, the court shall, notwithstanding, proceed to the trial of the person, so standing mute, or refusing to answer or pleas, as if he or she had pleaded not guilty; and upon a verdict being returned by the jury, may proceed to render judgment accordingly. A similar provision is to be found in the laws of Pennsylvania.
     4. The barbarous punishment of peine forte et dure which till lately disgraced the criminal code of England, was never known in the United States. Vide Dumb; 15 Vin. Ab. 527.
     5. When a prisoner stands mute, the laws of England arrive at the forced conclusion that he is guilty, and punish him accordingly. 1 Chit. Cr. Law, 428.
     6. By the old French law, when a person accused was mute, or stood mute, it was the duty of the judge to appoint him a curator, whose duty it was to defend him, in the best manner he could; and for this purpose, he was allowed to communicate with him privately. Poth. Proced. Crim. s. 4, art. 2, Sec. 1.

References in periodicals archive ?
By idealizing female muteness, Johnson argues, the man places himself in the position of the prostrate idolater, and paradoxically, reclaims the power as "victim" that he may have lost as (failed) sexual aggressor (153).
the humanness of bare life in the tension between muteness and
Ezekiel's namelessness; his muteness as he performed a series of actions symbolizing both God and Israel; and his being prohibited to mourn the loss of his wife all can be explained as aspects of serving as a priestly bridge between God and Israel.
These responses of paralysis and muteness suggest people overwhelmed by power.
The horror of the most heinous crime of the twentieth century resorts to muteness as a literary way of expressing the difficulty and near impossibility of saying anything meaningful about the Holocaust.
In his work there are the silences; a muteness pointing to an allusion to that which is not disempowered but hidden.
For instance, she describes the characters in Ana Poliak's La fe del volcan (The Faith of the Volcano, 2001) as marginalized victims of the neoliberal economy that by their muteness and impenetrability are irreducible to cultural dissection, and are therefore able to maintain their dissonance and plurality.
Although their formal styles are quite different, both Smith and Clifton employ a poetic form known as the persona poem or dramatic monologue to explore what Adrienne Rich called "the processes by which imposed silence, muteness, speechlessness have broken into language" (What Is Found There, 1994).
His writing credits include several television series in the UAE, as well as the plays Circles of Muteness and The Story that Sheherezade Didn't Tell.
Tartamudear is a combination of the notion of muteness (mudo) with tata (the added "r" to tata, tarta, is normal linguistic evolution in Spanish).
For Titus, Arnold deploys Bourdieu's idea of 'the alchemy of representation' to illuminate the first scene, as well as finding a fresh way of thinking about the different kinds of (imposed) muteness in Lavinia and the people.
The muteness of the visitors, however, hides a deep concern for us all.