Lamb

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Related to mutton: Mutton fish, hogget

LAMB. A ram, sheep or ewe, under the age of one year. 4 Car. & P. 216; S. C. 19 Eng. Com. Law Rep. 351.

References in classic literature ?
I never heerd a biled leg o' mutton called a swarry afore.
The greengrocer and his wife then arranged upon the table a boiled leg of mutton, hot, with caper sauce, turnips, and potatoes.
The leg of mutton came up very red within, and very pale without: besides having a foreign substance of a gritty nature sprinkled over it, as if if had had a fall into the ashes of that remarkable kitchen fireplace.
He came back again with the boiled mutton, and I was so excited by the appetising smell of it that I forgot the noise of the beast that had troubled me.
But to you, O hypercritical reader, resolute to believe no item of this weird adventure, what need to tell how the mutton was placed on the spit, and slowly unroasted--how the potatoes were wrapped in their skins, and handed over to the gardener to be buried--how, when the mutton had at length attained to rawness, the fire, which had gradually changed from red-heat to a mere blaze, died down so suddenly that the cook had only just time to catch its last flicker on the end of a match--or how the maid, having taken the mutton off the spit, carried it (backwards, of course) out of the house, to meet the butcher, who was coming (also backwards) down the road?
Numbers were daily brought into camp, and the flesh of those which were young and fat was extolled as superior to the finest mutton.
On the table were vodka, a flask of rum, white bread, roast mutton, and salt.
'You look a little shy; let me introduce you to that leg of mutton,' said the Red Queen.
First peeping over the handrail and allowing the head-dress to disappear in the darkness below, he groped his way down, and arrived at the door of a back kitchen immediately after Miss Brass had entered the same, bearing in her hand a cold leg of mutton. It was a very dark miserable place, very low and very damp: the walls disfigured by a thousand rents and blotches.
"Mutton broth, I believe, Sir Pitt," answered Lady Crawley.
They make you also guard their sheep, and while they eat the mutton throw only the bones to you.
"Did you observe, D'Artagnan, that three days running they have brought us braised mutton?"