mythological


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Related to mythological: Mythological creatures
See: fictitious
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See also ib., 1912, "The Nature of Perceived Relations," where he says: "'Introspection,' divested of its mythological suggestion of the observing of consciousness, is really the observation of bodily sensations (sensibles) and feelings
Tisher, while yet in the act of dressing; or (as she might have expressed the phrase to a parent or guardian of a mythological turn) of sacrificing to the Graces.
It happened in mythological times," said Madame Epanchin, looking wrathfully at her daughters, who had begun to laugh.
I was very much interested in her account of the Wieroo, which up to this time I had considered a purely mythological creature; but Ajor shuddered so at even the veriest mention of the name that I was loath to press the subject upon her, and so the Wieroo still remained a mystery to me.
(The poem imitates the Greek elegies, of which the earliest now preserved was the Lament by Bion for Adonis, the mythological youth beloved by Venus.) Shelley seems to have invented the name 'Adonais' (standing for 'Keats') on analogy with 'Adonis.' Stanzas 17,
Summary: Bhopal (Madhya Pradesh) [India], July 24 (ANI): Maharashtra Congress President Balasaheb Thorat on Wednesday likened BJP with 'Bakasur', a mythological demon in Mahabhar who always remained hungry.
Contributing a transcultural perspective to the vast literature on ancient myths around the Mediterranean and Near East, scholars from a number of disciplines discuss changing cultural and mythical landscapes in Anatolia, reception and innovation of mythological programs between Greece and Italy, and wandering east and south.
1) Mythological Culture History Bid price(Won): 103,829,960
There is, however, a sense in which anti-mythological stances are always ironic, because the ultimate ground of any stance is mythological. Myth is an aspect of all understanding, regardless of whether it is accurate or misguided, rational or irrational.
A week at the mythological birthplace of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love, pleasure, and beauty...
Its second exhibit has clear mythological references.
Bodies, beauty, sisterhood, sex, and sexism are only a few of the subjects pursued from their historical and mythological roots to their many modern iterations in this hard-hitting volume, which is at once profoundly political and inextricably personal.