nastiness


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See: mischief
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References in classic literature ?
Another thing he wondered at in the YAHOOS, was their strange disposition to nastiness and dirt; whereas there appears to be a natural love of cleanliness in all other animals.
The next moment, in a flashing vision of multitudinous detail, he sighted the whole sea of life's nastiness that he had known and voyaged over and through, and he forgave her for not understanding the story.
This backwoods bit of nastiness has at its dark heart the gory antics of 'the Hallow', tree-dwelling banshees living deep in an Irish forest who take babies and replace them with their own changelings.
What finally defeated Harper was the fact that enough Canadians had grown sick of the nastiness that they were willing to vote for whichever party had the best chance of beating him.
But there was nothing of the kind of danger and nastiness we see so often from football fans.
She knows I'm writing a book, so it's all fun and games, there's no nastiness.
I feel so sad at the amount of nastiness and vile comments that I'm hearing from both Everton and Liverpool supporters, and it's getting worse
Barbara's husband " Norman, 66, said: "George " Norman, 66, said: "George would feel a great sense of would feel a great sense of betrayal at all this and at betrayal at all this and at the nastiness of Calum's the nastiness of Calum's words.
NATALIA Kills and her husband Willy Moon lasted for one show as judges of the New Zealand X Factor before they were fired, quite rightly, for their gratuitous, unfunny nastiness towards a contestant.
In a world where hardcore online nastiness is more available and more viewed than ever, we seem to have In a world where hardcore online nastiness is more available and more viewed than ever, we seem to have come over all prudish.
However, no-one can defend the nastiness and petulance displayed by those who have had all the advantages of education, wealth and permanent lucrative employment.
There is a deep and growing nastiness in British society, whereby we have simply forgotten how to forgive" - Ann Widdecombe, former Tory minister.