nation

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nation

noun captive nation, commonweal, commonwealth, confederation, county, developed nation, dominion, kingdom, land, nationality, possession, power, province, realm, territory
Associated concepts: comity, free trade, international law
See also: nationality, polity, populace, population, public, state
References in periodicals archive ?
Addressing a gathering in Bhopal, Singh said that the meaning of nationalism is different in Islam.
He emphasizes the connection between nationalism and organic political unity, which appears in historical evidence such as Husri's writing or the Nasserist and al-Bath party's experience.
National defense and nationalism must go hand-in-hand.
A major element of this Muslim nationalism also undermined pan-Islamism because it believed that the ethos and social demeanor of Muslim culture in South Asia was largely separate from how Islam had evolved elsewhere.
Uzer situates the emergence of Turkish nationalism within the late Ottoman context where three overlapping processes contributed to its making.
Every aspect of development - social, economic, political and cultural - is informed by the spirit of nationalism, and moved by its emotional impetus".
What factors fuel the construction of popular nationalism through news discourses in China?
He argues, "We should not deny Newfoundland its recent history of nationalism and national identity" (40), though later he states that "It is not the purpose to establish here whether Newfoundland is a 'real' nation or not .
Although traditional explorations of nationalism (especially Southern nationalism) have, implicitly or explicitly, seen it as a static ideology measurable against some unspoken yardstick of loyalty or disloyalty to the federal government, Quigley laudably takes a different approach, which is concerned as much with process as outcome.
In this volume, Lai Yew Meng seeks to understand whether nationalism is the main driver of Japan's China policy, and the precise conditions under which nationalism matters in shaping that policy.
What is more, casual racism has a different history in different parts of the world, and Irish nationalism as a political movement was involved in all those parts: Ireland-in-Europe, the Irish diaspora in the US and elsewhere, and the transnational entanglements between Irish nationalism and (a) European national movements, (b) anticolonial movements in the wider world and (c) emancipatory movements in the US.
Perhaps the greatest merit and value of the new book by the American social anthropologist Jenny White, titled "Muslim Nationalism and the New Turks" (Princeton University Press, 2012), is that it shatters this cliche that blinds many an eye to the realities of Turkey today.