near relation

References in classic literature ?
Now many persons suppose, from their near relation to each other, that this is one and the same with that we have just mentioned, but it is not the same as that, though not very different; one of these is natural, the other is not, but rather owing to some art and skill; we will enter into a particular examination of this subject.
With my head full of George Barnwell, I was at first disposed to believe that I must have had some hand in the attack upon my sister, or at all events that as her near relation, popularly known to be under obligations to her, I was a more legitimate object of suspicion than any one else.
She is a relation of the Colonel's, my dear; a very near relation.
I had the good fortune to escape in a most surprizing manner, and am now going to London with this young lady, who is a near relation of mine, and who hath escaped from as great a tyrant as my own.
No, sir, he is dead; and I believe it is from him my guardian, whose near relation he was, inherited the estate from which I take my name.
If not, please supply us with the names of any of her near relations or intimate female friends whom you know, and we will endeavor to get access for you.
He had now no near relations living, and he had never made many friends.
If we squires were the sons of the knights we serve, or their very near relations, it would be no wonder if the penalty of their misdeeds overtook us, even to the fourth generation.
Then Henry Carey married a patient, a beautiful girl but penniless, an orphan with no near relations, but of good family; and there was an array of fine friends at the wedding.
But he had no near relations of his own - none but a nephew he'd quarrelled with; and he always had a partiality for this one.
Anne had gone unhappy to school, grieving for the loss of a mother whom she had dearly loved, feeling her separation from home, and suffering as a girl of fourteen, of strong sensibility and not high spirits, must suffer at such a time; and Miss Hamilton, three years older than herself, but still from the want of near relations and a settled home, remaining another year at school, had been useful and good to her in a way which had considerably lessened her misery, and could never be remembered with indifference.
I like Ned too--or, as you say, love him--that's the word among such near relations.