negative clearance

negative clearance

the procedure in the competition policy of the EUROPEAN UNION whereby the Commission of the European Union issues a decision at the request of an undertaking indicating that it does not consider that a given proposal is prohibited by its competition law. The Channel Tunnel project was so referred. Alternatively it may issue a COMFORT LETTER.
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The decision completes the environmental analysis of the project site that began in July 2008 when the Stephentown Planning Board approved the environmental aspects of the project by issuing its own Negative Clearance and Determination of Non-Significance for the project.
The applicants asked the Commission to either grant a negative clearance under Article 81(1) of the EC Treaty or an exemption from the cartel prohibition under Article 81(3).
AcSEC's due process also includes requesting "negative clearance" from the FASB at one of its public meetings.
Squeezing or piercing occurs at the center due to the large negative clearance. The NPD solves this problem by eliminating the cutting edge and the relief surface in the central region of the drill.
At the moment, only the Commission has the power to oversee this system, but its anti-trust department is overwhelmed by this sort of information from companies that still have to notify agreements that are certain to gain an exemption or negative clearance from EU competition rules.
The Commission said its Competition Directorate-General had closed the case after sending Eutelsat a negative clearance administrative letter to say it did not fall within the scope of Article 81(1) of the EC Treaty on restrictive business agreements.
81 of the EU Treaty) governing restrictive business practices (negative clearance letter) or qualified for exemption from these rules (exemption letter).
This resulted in the formal decision giving "negative clearance" from EU competition rules.
BT has also agreed not to expand its existing cable television interests in the UK and to divest its existing interests.--On June 13, 1997, BSkyB Ltd, BT Holdings Limited, Midland Bank plc and Matsushita Electric Europe Ltd informed the Commission that they were setting up a joint venture company, British Interactive Broadcasting Ltd (BiB, now called Open), and requested negative clearance and/or exemption pursuant to Regulation No 17/62 applying anti-trust joint ventures.
Back in March, the Commission had indicated its intention to grant negative clearance from EU competition rules for the agreements.
For this reason, the Commission decided that the Pooling Agreement does not restrict competition in an appreciable manner within the meaning of Article 85@1 of the EC Treaty ('negative clearance').The April 16 Decision also deals with the International Group Agreement (IG Agreement).
This effectively clears the professional Code as falling outside the scope of EU anti-trust rules (referred to as 'negative clearance').But the Commission has only granted an exemption until April 23, 2000 from competition rules in respect of the specific provisions of the Code of Conduct prohibiting EPI members from carrying out comparative advertising and from actively offering services to users which have already been clients of other representatives.