neglect

(redirected from neglects)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Neglect

An omission to do or perform some work, duty, or act.

As used by U.S. courts, the term neglect denotes the failure of responsibility on the part of defendants or attorneys. Neglect is related to the concept of Negligence, but its rather limited use in the law sets it apart from that much broader doctrine. Generally speaking, neglect means omitting or failing to do something that is required. Neglect is often related to timeliness: examples include the failure of a taxpayer to file a timely income tax return and the failure of an attorney to meet a deadline for filing an appeal. In determining whether to rule against a party, courts consider the reason for the neglect, which can range from unavoidable accidents and hindrances to the less acceptable extreme of carelessness and indifference to duty.

Special terminology applies to some forms of neglect. Culpable neglect exists where a loss arises from an individual's carelessness, improvidence, or folly. Willful neglect applies to marital cases; it refers to the neglect of one spouse, historically the husband, to provide such essentials as food, shelter, and clothing to the other spouse, either because of refusal or indifference. Excusable neglect is used to grant exceptions in cases where neglect was the consequence of accident, unavoidable hindrance, reliance on legal counsel, or reliance on promises made by the adverse party. Excusable neglect can serve as the basis for a motion to vacate a judgment, as in the case of explaining why a deadline for filing an appeal could not be met. Under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, excusable neglect authorizes a court to permit an act to be done after the official deadline has expired (Fed. R. Civ. P. 6 (b)).

Cross-references

Child Abuse; Necessaries.

neglect

noun abandonment, absentmindedness, breach, bungling, careless abandon, carelessness, default, delinquency, dereliction, disregard, failure, heedlessness, idleness, improvidence, imprudence, inaction, inadvertence, inattention, inattentiveness, incuria, indifference, indiligence, inexecution, inexertion, laches, laxity, laxness, misprision, neglegentia, negligence, noncompletion, nonfeasance, nonfulfillment, nonobservance, nonperformance, omission, oversight, procrastination, rashness, recklessness, remissness, slackness, slight, sloth, slovenliness, thoughtlessness, unactivity, unconcern, unconscientiousness, unheedfulness, unobservance, unwariness, unwatchfulness
Associated concepts: culpable neglect, neglect of duty, neggect to act, neglect to prosecute, willful neglect
Foreign phrases: Magna culpa dolus est.Gross neglect is the equivalent of fraud.

neglect

verb be careless, be inattentive, be lax, disdain, disregard, fail, forget, gloss over, ignore, lay aside, leave alone, lose sight of, neglegere, not care for, not use, omit, overlook, pass by, pass over, pay no attention, pay no heed to, pay no regard to, pretermit, procrastinate, refuse to recognize, shirk, shun, skip, slight, take no note, take no notice
See also: blame, break, culpability, default, delinquency, dereliction, desuetude, disinterest, disobey, disregard, disrepair, disuse, eschew, exclude, ignore, inconsideration, indifference, laches, laxity, leave, maladministration, mismanage, misprision, nonpayment, nonperformance, nonuse, omission, omit, overlook, override, oversight, pretermit, procrastinate, rebuff, reject, rejection, repudiate, shirk, shun, spurn, violate
References in classic literature ?
I am sure you neglect nothing that can add to the beauties of that noble place.
I then thought that my father would be unjust if he ascribed my neglect to vice or faultiness on my part, but I am now convinced that he was justified in conceiving that I should not be altogether free from blame.
Will she find an excuse for the neglect of the knight in the duty of a soldier?
It said the cruelty and neglect happens "when an adult who has responsibility for a child wilfully assaults, ill-treats, neglects, abandons or causes them unnecessary suffering or injury".
Sarah Rochira wants the law changed to make it easier to prosecute anyone who abuses or neglects older people or allows crimes to take place, such as health and social care providers and managers.
And way in the background is the matter of Gideon's own deteriorating health, which he neglects even more than his son.