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Related to neural network: Artificial neural network

AI

abbreviation for ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
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Competitive Neural Network. The competitive neural network is a simple neural network that consists of two layers and uses an unsupervised learning algorithm for training.
The application of neural network in cryptanalysis is mainly used for the global deduction of cryptographic algorithms [1] (the algorithm that the attacker obtains and encrypts and decrypts may not know the key) and the complete crack [1] (the attacker obtains the key).
The value of the humidity should be less than 0.12; from experimental data the data range input and output parameters used for neural network training are shown in Table 1.
These results can be achieved using multilinear regression approach or neural network analysis.
In current assay, an artificial neural network modeling has been applied to determine the best coagulant rate in the water treatment plant according to a back-propagation training method.
Wong, "Robust stability of interval bidirectional associative memory neural network with time delays", IEEE Trans.
For neural network model (1), the conventional definition of solution for differential equations cannot apply here.
An artificial neural network (ANN) is a computational system which mimics the functioning of a human brain.
Three predictive models had been developed namely Artificial Neural Network, Decision Tree and Linear regression.
Also, because the training step is a very computationally expensive part of the implementation of the neural network, performing this step optically is key to improving the computational efficiency, speed and power consumption of artificial networks.
Sure enough, the neural network was able to predict reasonably well the exact pattern of a graph of light scattering versus wavelength -- not perfectly, but very close, and in much less time.

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