Block

(redirected from neuromuscular block)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to neuromuscular block: nondepolarizing agents

Block

A segment of a town or city surrounded by streets and avenues on at least three sides and usually occupied by buildings, though it may be composed solely of vacant lots. The section of a city enclosed by streets that is described by a map which indicates how a portion of land will be subdivided.

References in periodicals archive ?
Laparoscopic surgery in a morbidly obese, high-risk cardiac patient: The benefits of deep neuromuscular block and sugammadex.
Kashiwai et al., "The effects of age on maintenance of intense neuromuscular block with rocuronium,' 'Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, vol.
The significance of this study was that the dosage of neostigmine can be reduced properly when used to antagonize the residual neuromuscular block in septic patients.
Cammu et al., "Effective reversal of moderate rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block with sugammadex, a selective relaxant binding agent," Anesthesiology, vol.
Then, if neuromuscular block is present, the 4th and 5th fingers will not move; on the other hand, if normal neuromuscular transmission is present, the typical picture of main-en-griffe will result.
Utilizing advanced electromyography (EMG) to quantify a patient's depth of neuromuscular block, TwitchView[TM] neuromuscular TOF monitor provides clinicians with reliable and accurate real-time data to support drug dosing decisions and reversal timing, helping prevent residual neuromuscular blockade.
Conclusions: Lower end-extubation intraocular pressure levels were obtained when sugammadex was used as a neuromuscular block reversal agent in comparison with neostigmine-atropine combination.
[16-18] Thus quantitative data on the effect of anti-cholinesterase drugs in patients receiving MgS[O.sub.4] are needed for safe management of neuromuscular block. Research from the early 1950s first elucidated the nature of the effects of calcium and magnesium ions at the neuromuscular junction.
The clinical significance of this was emphasised in 2002 when the Anaesthetic Incident Monitoring Survey study showed residual neuromuscular block to be the major contributor to critical respiratory events in the postoperative recovery period (3).
A neuromuscular block was antagonised with neostigmine (0.05 mg [kg.sup.-1]) and atropine (0.015 mg [kg.sup.-1]).