no-fault


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no-fault

a convenient phrase used to describe compensation systems that do not depend upon the claimant establishing the fault of some other person. The most often discussed is the New Zealand ACCIDENT COMPENSATION system. However, even in the UK interstitial reform is bringing about a larger area of no-fault liability, some within the delict/tort system and some of it outside. See ACCIDENT, ANIMAL LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
No-fault was essentially defeated by the leeway given for lawsuits.
The average $100,000 policy may include only $1,000 of no-fault medical coverage for which you can get reimbursement for medical bills.
In Pennsylvania, supporters of a proposal to abolish unilateral no-fault divorce where children are involved argue that the unilateral system has hurt children by encouraging frivolous breakups.
"The introduction of the no-fault divorce is long overdue, removing blame and simplifying the process."
She said the number of 'no-fault' evictions could be much higher as the data only showed cases that made it to court, and "most renters simply leave when told to and their eviction isn't recorded anywhere".
On August 19, 2015, the plaintiff commenced this action pursuant to Insurance Law [section] 5106(c) for a de novo determination of the defendant's claims for no-fault insurance benefits.
Specialist lawyer Ayesha Vardag founded law firm Vardags and has campaigned for no-fault divorce provision.
A similar no-fault system has been proposed as an alternative to medical tort litigation, but it has yet to be established in the developed world.
The panel disagreed with the plaintiff's argument that the 2017 Michigan Supreme Court Covenant decision, establishing that a healthcare provider does not have a direct cause of action against no-fault insurers, applies only prospectively.
A high-profile insurance fraud case on appeal in New York is being closely watched by fraud fighters across the country for the impact the decision will have on no-fault law.
The Supreme Court promulgated amendments to the rule governing the Standing Committee on No-Fault Arbitration to delete obsolete language and provide the Committee flexibility, effective January 1, 2019.
DIVORCE laws are set for a major shake-up, with proposals for no-fault separations under consideration.