nobility


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NOBILITY. An order of men in several countries to whom privileges are granted at the expense of the rest of the people.
     2. The constitution of the United States provides that no state shall "grant any title of nobility; and no person can become a citizen of the United States until he has renounced all titles of nobility." The Federalist, No. 84; 2 Story, Laws U. S. 851. 3. There is not in the constitution any general prohibition against any citizen whomsoever, whether in public or private life, accepting any foreign title of nobility. An amendment of the constitution in this respect has been recommended by congress, but it has not been ratified by a sufficient number of states to make it a part of the constitution. Rawle on the Const. 120; Story, Const. Sec. 1346.

References in classic literature ?
The nobility don't gwudge theah lives- evewy one of us will go and bwing in more wecwuits, and the sov'weign" (that was the way he referred to the Emperor) "need only say the word and we'll all die fo' him
He hardened his heart against the senator who was introducing this set and narrow attitude into the deliberations of the nobility.
whom I have not the honor of knowing, I suppose that the nobility have been summoned not merely to express their sympathy and enthusiasm but also to consider the means by which we can assist our Fatherland
In the first place, I tell you we have no right to question the Emperor about that, and secondly, if the Russian nobility had that right, the Emperor could not answer such a question.
O my brethren, not backward shall your nobility gaze, but OUTWARD
Your CHILDREN'S LAND shall ye love: let this love be your new nobility,-- the undiscovered in the remotest seas
Well, I am going to exercise my prerogative of roaring and show you how fares nobility.
Besides her predilection for the nobility, Mademoiselle Cormon had another and very excusable mania: that of being loved for herself.
Those two majestic relics of the nobility and clergy, though of very different habits and morals, recognized each other by their generous traits.
This moral phenomenon will not seem surprising to persons who know that the qualities of the heart are as distinct from those of the mind as the faculties of genius are from the nobility of soul.
These poor ostensible freemen who were sharing their breakfast and their talk with me, were as full of humble reverence for their king and Church and nobility as their worst enemy could desire.
After ascending to the English throne in February 1685 he lasted less than four years before a suspicious protestant nobility - supported by large swathes of the population - fetched his nephew William III of Orange to invade England and kick him out.