nonlegal

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References in periodicals archive ?
at 581 ("Legality refers to the choice between legally binding and nonlegally binding accords (for simplicity, I term this a choice between contracts and pledges).
The United States responded by supporting a nonlegally binding OECD recommendation, {-,P,d}.
Rock & Wachter, supra note 21, at 1622 ("[T]he raison d'etre of firms is to replace legal governance of relations with nonlegally enforceable governance mechanisms.
Nonlegally Binding Authoritative Statement of Principles for a Global Consensus on the Management, Conservation and Sustainable Development of All Types of Forests, June 13, 1992, U.
In our article, we try to provide a general account of the role that corporate law plays in facilitating self-governance by nonlegally enforced rules and standards.
As a test of this proposition, try to think of an instance in which judgment proofing was sanctioned nonlegally.
These data shows the cost per hour worked for all nonlegally required benefits in public utilities was $4.
Court officials, including judges, will need to be trained in the requirements and special considerations of dealing with nonlegally trained people.
This Article provides a theory of the relation between legal and nonlegally enforceable rules and standards in the corporation, and then uses that theory to analyze a variety of prominent features of corporate law.
At times he refers to the school just as "HLS," which may be mystifying to the nonlegally trained sports fan at whom the book is aimed.
1619, 1622 (2001) (arguing that corporate law protects and perfects the choice of firms "to replace legal governance of relations with nonlegally enforceable governance mechanisms [that is, norms]").
As a modest step toward filling these gaps in the literature, in this Article I examine the creation, persistence, and evolution of a series of highly complementary, nonlegally enforceable practices that shaped postwar corporate governance for large Japanese firms.