nonviolence

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King argues that the greatest accomplishments of the first Intifada overlap with its most nonviolent phase, which is also when the greatest number of Palestinians were active in the resistance: building semi-autonomous institutions throughout the Occupied Territories, refusing to pay taxes to Israeli occupation authorities, quitting jobs in the civil administration, boycotting Israeli products, organizing joint demonstrations with Israeli and international sympathizers, and engaging in countless other nonviolent campaigns.
Benefits of the movie: This documentary graphically demonstrates that as war has become more violent, people have adapted by developing a new political force of immense power: nonviolent mass action (also called civil disobedience).
Cortright tells the story of some of the most important and well-known practitioners of nonviolent action, from Gandhi and King to Cesar Chavez and Dorothy Day, and he explains the theories and practices of some not-so-well-known scholars and activists such as Gene Sharp and Barbara Deming.
One such group, Nonviolent Peaceforce, has been deploying unarmed peace teams in Sri Lanka for the last three years and has succeeded in saving lives, returning refugees safely to their homes and supporting Sri Lankan peace makers.
July 18-21: Nonviolent Crisis Intervention; St John, NB; Call 1-800-558-8976 or register online at www.
Despite the research on recidivism, there are no studies that look at and compare the predictors of violent offending with the predictors of nonviolent offending.
Chernus introduces us to a chorus of nonviolent voices that includes Anabaptists and Quakers wrestling with issues of participation in American society and abolitionists struggling against the temptation to use force in the fight to end slavery.
Once dubbed the "Clausewitz of nonviolent warfare," Sharp, 77, has spent the last five decades researching and promoting the application of nonviolent methods to some of the world's biggest problems.
He has been called "the Clausewitz of nonviolent warfare," in reference to the Prussian military philosopher Carl von Clausewitz.
As staged by Filipino nuns, students, merchants, and workers, a three-year nonviolent revolt brought him down.
Senior scholar at the Albert Einstein Institution of Boston, Massachusetts Gene Sharp and his team of like-minded researchers apply 50 years of history, academics, and practical experience to present Waging Nonviolent Struggle: 20th Century Practice and 21st Century Potential, a meticulous accounting of how nonviolent methodologies can combat dictatorships, war, genocide, and oppression.