not badly

See: fairly
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References in classic literature ?
Her dresses, badly chosen as to their hues, were perhaps not badly made, but were certainly badly worn.
He could do everything, not very well but not badly. He baked, cooked, sewed, planed, and mended boots.
It needed but a brief examination to show that he was not badly hurt.
Anderson's ball--for it was Job that shot him first-- had broken his shoulder-blade and touched the lung, not badly; the second had only torn and displaced some muscles in the calf.
She was overdressed, but not badly dressed, in black with a high collar, and she wore black glace gloves, in which she played cards; she had several heavy gold chains round her neck, bangles on her wrists, and circular photograph pendants, one being of Queen Alexandra; she carried a black satin bag and chewed Sen-sens.
"Hush, gossip," said the curate; "please God, the luck may turn, and what is lost to-day may be won to-morrow; for the present let your worship have a care of your health, for it seems to me that you are over-fatigued, if not badly wounded."
It was the portrait of a gentleman in the full prime of youthful manhood - handsome enough, and not badly executed; but if done by the same hand as the others, it was evidently some years before; for there was far more careful minuteness of detail, and less of that freshness of colouring and freedom of handling that delighted and surprised me in them.
"Not badly answered, i'faith," said Gondy, laughing; "but I have, you must know, always had, in spite of my bands, warlike inclinations."
"You are not badly off here," he said, smiling, as if he meant to lodge there himself.
"Not badly got up for barbarians," mused friend Joe, speaking his thoughts aloud.
"But listen, there are women's voices singing, and, on my word, not badly too.
It was not badly named in one respect, being in truth a particularly little Bethel--a Bethel of the smallest dimensions-- with a small number of small pews, and a small pulpit, in which a small gentleman (by trade a Shoemaker, and by calling a Divine) was delivering in a by no means small voice, a by no means small sermon, judging of its dimensions by the condition of his audience, which, if their gross amount were but small, comprised a still smaller number of hearers, as the majority were slumbering.