notoriety


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

notoriety

noun attaint, bad report, bad reputation, bad repute, bruit, celebrity, censure, conspicuousness, dedecoration, degradation, denunciation, disapprobation, discredit, disesteem, disfavor, disgrace, dishonor, disreputability, disreputableness, disrepute, distinction, eclat, eminence, fama, fame, flagrancy, ignominy, ignomy, ill repute, imputation, indignity, infamia, infamousness, infamy, ingloriousness, loss of honor, loss of reputation, name, notability, obloquy, odium, opprobrium, popular repute, prominence, public notice, publicity, recognition, renown, reproach, reputation, repute, scandal, shame, slur, stigma, stigmatization, taint, unrespectability
See also: bad repute, character, common knowledge, disgrace, dishonor, infamy, opprobrium, prestige, publicity, reputation, scandal, shame, stigma

NOTORIETY, evidence. That which is generally known.
     2. This notoriety is of fact or of law. In general, the notoriety of a fact is not sufficient to found a judgment or to rely on its truth; 1 Ohio Rep. 207; but there are some facts of which, in consequence of their notoriety, the court will, suo motu, take cognizance; for example, facts stated in ancient histories; Skin. 14; 1 Ventr. R. 149; 2 East, Rep. 464; 9 Ves. jr. 347; 10 Ves.jr. 854; 8 John. Rep. 385; 1 Binn. R. 399; recitals in statutes; Co. Lit. 19 b; 4 M. & S. 542; and in the law text books; 4 Inst. 240; 2 Rags. 313; and the journals of the legislatures, are considered of such notoriety that they need not be otherwise proved.
     3. The courts of the United States take judicial notice of the, ports and waters of the United States, in, which the tide ebbs and flows. 3 Dall. 297; 9 Wheat. 374; 10 Wheat. 428; 7 Pet. 342. They take like notice of the boundaries, of the several states and judicial districts. It would be altogether unnecessary, if not absurd, to prove the fact that London in Great Britain or Paris in France, is not within the jurisdiction of an American court, because the fact is notoriously known.
     4. It is difficult to say what will amount to such notoriety as to render any other proof unnecessary. This must depend upon many circumstances; in one case, perhaps upon the progress of human knowledge in the fields of science; in another, on the extent of information on the state of foreign countries, and in all such instances upon the accident of their being little known or publicly communicated. The notoriety of the law is such that the judges are always bound to take notice of it; statutes, precedents and text books are therefore evidence, without any other proof than, their production. Gresley, Ev. 293. The courts of the United States take judicial notice of all laws and jurisprudence of the several states in which they exercise original or appellate jurisdiction. 9 Pet. 607, 624.
     5. The doctrine of the civil and canon laws is similar to this. Boehmer in tit. 10, de probat. lib. 2, t. 19, n. 2; Mascardus, de probat conclus. 1106, 1107, et seq.; Menock. de praesumpt. lib. 1, quaest. 63, &c.; Toullier Dr. Civ. Frau. liv. 3, c. 6, n. 13; Diet. de Jurisp. mot Notoriete; 1 Th. Co. Lit. 26, n. 16; 2 Id. 63, n. A; Id. 334, n. 6; Id. 513, n. T 3; 9 Dana, 23 12 Vern. 178; 5 Port. 382; 1 Chit. PI. 216, 225.

References in periodicals archive ?
SPO3 Ariel Galvelo, Pasig police follow-up unit chief, said that Ciervo gained notoriety for asking his victims, mostly females, to take off all of their clothes so that they could not run after him.
Birmingham has real Kelly, after Ms Hinte hiding the take against who clai"Susanne has earned herself notoriety.
Dame Maggie, 80, is aware of her notoriety but puts the fear factor down to one thing - being scared herself.
The LAPD also has created a Most Wanted list that publicly identifies gangs and their members -- a change in the department's long-standing reluctance about giving the gangsters notoriety.
Offshore fisherman and avid conservationist Charles Sobczak presents Alligators, Sharks & Panthers: Deadly Encounters with Florida's Top Predator--Man, an evenhanded discussion of four deadly species: alligators, who have committed nearly four hundred attacks in Florida since 1948; panthers, whose rare assaults have been historically authenticated; sharks, whose notoriety needs no explanation; and man, who has slaughtered thousands and millions of these dangerous yet endangered animal predators.
One chapter traces how the notoriety of Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, "America's first hip-hop mayor" represents the complex blend of pre-existing stereotypes and self-inflicted wounds.
The first was when he was advised that he needed a headline-grabbing experience to give him notoriety, such as 50-Cent's being shot nine times.
Gross said he's enjoying GF55's newfound success and notoriety.
While violent attacks and hate crimes directed at day laborers have gained notoriety for Farmingville, local officials mounted a systematic effort to evict Latino immigrants from their homes based on technical violations of housing codes.
Pros of blogging: "Expression, notoriety, and free stuff.
The research is conducted through measurements of brand notoriety or awareness, knowledge of which is of great importance to advertisers.
Diesel-fueled vehicles have gained notoriety for their oily carbon emissions.