family

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family

n. 1) husband, wife and children. 2) all blood relations. 3) all who live in the same household including servants and relatives, with some person or persons directing this economic and social unit.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another consideration in instrument development was defining the unit of study, that is, the nuclear family. The nuclear family unit for this study was defined as the adults and any of their offspring who live together at least part time.
These components of the modern nuclear family reflected the fundamental beliefs of modernity.
The nuclear family is the seat of rational individualism.
According to lead researcher Dr Wolfgang Haak of the University of Adelaide, "By establishing the genetic links between the two adults and two children buried together in one grave, we have established the presence of the classic nuclear family in a prehistoric context in Central Europe - to our knowledge the oldest authentic molecular genetic evidence so far."
"The hospitals offer us a two-year contract where our nuclear family can come along to live with us in the U.S.," she says.
Specifically, the middle-class nuclear family, which had long been understood as the basis of the social fabric, seems to have become a subject for images at a time in which the center of the state was being moved from monarchs and aristocrats to the middle-class family, and new forms of social and political life were evolving.
Statistics Canada shows that the traditional family is in big trouble; fewer people are living in the traditional nuclear family, and more and more are living in sin.
A full cast of McCarthy's body, positioned facing the corner (shame on him), and its mold flank big packing crates that are, of course, way more than packing crates: They are Tony Smith's Die, 1962, the big box of Minimalism; the Chapman brothers' Six Feet Under, 1997 (with the remains of the nuclear family after meltdown); a magician's mystery box, in which he saws a woman in half and she emerges whole.
After this adventure the man and his sons shuffle over to Mass, where they meet the female members of their nuclear family, and generally the man and the woman pay close attention--the man because he is absorbed by stories and magic, and the woman because she wishes always to be moved and startled by what sometimes happens in a Mass, which is to say a shafted arrow to the heart disguised as a word, or a phrase, or the Eucharist, or a song, or a child grinning, or the way the priest exuberantly rings out communicants' names when he hands them the miraculous splinter: "The Body of Christ, Peter!"
In its zeal to promote "family values," all the rage under the new Administration, the Census Bureau issued a press release in April bearing the happy title, "The 'Nuclear Family' Rebounds," claiming that the "traditional" family--comprised of two parents and their children--was on the rise.
The way the story goes, a trespassing towheaded pre-teen barged into the rustic country cottage of a nuclear family of anthropomorphic bruins.
If true, it undermines the central argument driving much of the work around responsible fatherhood: that a traditional nuclear family is the only viable environment for raising kids because fathers are biologically wired, as his group puts it, to make "unique and irreplaceable" contributions to their children's lives.

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