numerousness


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Complexity is the term covering numerousness and intricacy of elements and mutual relationships of an entity with the environment in given time.
It is for this very reason that on various occasions the Qur'an has recounted the multiplicity and numerousness of nature, and in some other cases, has explicitly declared man's impotence in being able to count the same.
As I noted earlier an obvious part of the contrast is built around children, the frequent reference to images of numbers of African children becoming images of numerousness itself, while the expatriates are either childless, or have children that we hardly see.
Meanwhile, many industries in China are characterized by numerousness of firms, sub-optimal scale of production, as well as severe overcapacities.
But the very numerousness of the indexes and resource pages tends to undercut their usefulness: they can be as hard to find and evaluate as the sites they recommend.
Few late-eighteenth-century or early nineteenth-century readers of Thomas Malthus would have quarreled with the latter's assertion, flattering for many of them, that British "society" had in their lifetime acquired "a new and happier structure"; many would have concurred that this transformation was the result of an unprecedented numerousness of and unity among "the middle classes, that body on which the liberty, public spirit and good government of every country must mainly depend.
Of the major Victorian novelists, only Trollope rivals Thackeray in the numerousness and apparent virulence of his anti-Semitic caricatures--verbal and pictorial.
First, then, there is the reformers' fascination with population growth, on the basic assumption that "the Strength and Riches of a National Community consist in the Health and Numerousness of its Labourers," to quote Jekyll once more.
Our failures to relate meaningfully to numerousness, to cumulative effects, and to the difference between numbers and real-world events, for example, continuously hamper efforts to reduce prejudice, pollution, and financial disasters.
One could generate all such variations and identify them all as distinct methods, but both the need for descriptive parsimony and the sheer numerousness of the methods that would result argue against doing that.
Catholics, and their numerousness raises the question, To whom does the Church belong?
h) Due to the sheer numerousness of neurons it is more convenient to focus on global fields, which may be associated with cognitive activity.