history

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history

(Background), noun account, adventures, all aspects, all sides, delineation, depiction, each and every deeail, entire universe, epic, events, exposition, facts, information, intelligence, narrative, recapitulation, recital, record, representation, retelling, review, saga, series of incidents, story, summary

history

(Past), noun annals, archives, bygone era, chronicle, days of old, earlier point in time, historical times, old days, prior point in time, prior time, record, schedule, the past, times gone by, tradition, yesterday
Associated concepts: Legal history
See also: account, ancestry, bloodline, calendar, common knowledge, narrative, record, report, story

HISTORY, evidence. The recital of facts written and given out for true.
     2. Facts stated in histories may be read in evidence, on the ground of their notoriety. Skin. R. 14; 1 Ventr. R. 149. But these facts must be of a public nature, and the general usages and customs of the country. Bull. P. 248; 7 Pet. R. 554; 1 Phil. & Am. Ev. 606; 30 Howell's St. Tr. 492. Histories are not admissible in relation to matters not of a public nature, such as the custom of a particular town, a descent, the boundaries of a county, and the like. 1 Salk. 281; S. C. Skin. 623; T. Jones, 164; 6 C. & P. 586, note. See 9 Ves. 347; 10 Ves. 354; 3 John. 385; 1 Binn. 399; and Notoriety.

References in periodicals archive ?
A more concise nursing history that can be transferred into electronic format
Nursing before Nightingale places nursing history in broad sociocultural contexts and challenges historians in other fields to consider healthcare as central to the nineteenth-century master narrative.
As might be expected, this account of nursing and nurse leaders differs from the laudatory history traditionally found in nursing history texts .
Rogers' writings in Nursing Science and other original works assist nurses and other professions interested in nursing and nursing history to learn about nursing in the context of the author, Rogers, the times in which she lived and worked, and her enormous contribution to professional nursing.
More than bombs and bandages is a welcome addition to the Australian nursing history canon and particularly to the history of Australian military nursing.
This article describes four sources relevant to New Zealand nursing history and shows how the historian can understand and link the information they contain.
The author also thanks Gertrude Hutchinson, archivist of the Bellevue Alumnae Center for Nursing History, Foundation of New York State Nurses, for her invaluable research assistance.
In contrast, nurses who were atheists (who believed there were no deities), nurses who used blocking behavior consciously, nurses who were most afraid of dying, nurses who had lower levels of anxiety after completing the most difficult nursing history, nurses who committed a lot of their time to outside interests and nurses who had conflicts with fellow colleagues, exhibited greater blocking behaviors when communicating with patients.
Some nurse historians have briefly mentioned the idea that nursing history can have application in the present (Mitchell 2002; Rafferty 1997/98; Lusk 1997; Cushing 1995; Hezel and Linebach 1991; Sarnecky 1990).
Pat encourages every nurse to learn more about how this builds on national nursing history by visiting the National Nurse website.
Nursing on the Canadian prairies, 1900-1930: Effects of immigration, Nursing History Review, (1), 105-117.
My objective was not so much that students would remember the specific contributions of these giants in nursing history.

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