obiter dicta


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obiter dicta

(oh-bitter dick-tah) n. remarks of a judge which are not necessary to reaching a decision, but are made as comments, illustrations or thoughts. Generally, obiter dicta is simply "dicta." (See: dicta, dictum)

References in periodicals archive ?
Druet especially is significant because not only does it confirm, albeit in obiter dicta, what the others confirm about the acceptability of email negotiations for an enforceable agreement pursuant to the Statute of Frauds, but it highlights the fundamental purpose of the Act as a means for confirming agreement to significant contracts such as for the sale of property or for guarantees.
He wrote of the phrase, "the seemingly innocuous obiter dicta, the words in passing, that give the game away.
At times, however, these statements and opinions - obiter dicta, if you wish - strike me not only as bold and apodictic but also as highly debatable, to say the least.
Certainly, Schillebeeckx deserves to be judged, and will be judged, by his theological writings and above all, by his massive works on Christology and not by such obiter dicta as are collected here.
Bell's obiter dicta come thick and fast, stray facts and thoughts pop forth like tempting plums from a pudding.
Obiter dicta , Latin for casual remarks or observations, are the privilege of the courts that are allowed to digress and talk about almost everything under the sun.
6) While Davies does not share Spenser's passion for ethnography, his obiter dicta comparisons between the Irish and the ancient "Gauls, Germans .