Object

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Object

As a verb, to take exception to something; to declare or express the belief that something is improper or illegal.As a noun, the thing sought to be accomplished or attained; aim; purpose; intention.

One might, for example, object to the admission of particular evidence at a trial.

The object of a civil suit, for example, might be to be compensated in the form of damages for an injury incurred.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

object

1) v. to ask the court not to allow a particular question asked of a witness by the opposing lawyer on the basis that it is either legally not permitted or in its wording is confusing or improper in its "form." An attorney may also object to an answer on the basis that it is not "responsive," to the question, on the basis a witness is limited to answering a question and is not allowed to make unsolicited comments. The trial attorney must be alert and quick in order to object before the witness answers. This is called an "objection" and must be based on a specific list of legal restrictions on questions. 2) n. a particular thing. 3) n. an aim or purpose, as "the object of the contract..." (See: objection)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.