obligate


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obligate

verb agree to perform, agree to be burrened with, assume a duty, assume a moral responsibility for, assume responsibility for, assume the performance of, become legally responsible for, become obliged, charged with, committed to accomplish, compel, contracted, covenanted, indebted to, promise to do
Associated concepts: contractual duties, implied obligations
See also: assign, coerce, compel, constrain, detail, encumber, entail, exact, force, guarantee, necessitate, press, require
References in periodicals archive ?
(30) The SIGIR made it clear that there was no chicanery in this terminology, but that the COE intended to obligate in-scope modifications and estimated cost-to-complete projects.
* Additionally, the Secretary may not use the provided national interest exception to obligate funding in excess of 115 percent of the authorized amount for those five programs above identified with an (*).
Note that although daily prayer seems as quintessentially time-bound as a mizvah could possibly be, given the termini a quo and ad quem presented later in Mishnah Berakhot, the Mishnah's ruling that women are obligated, when examined in the context of general principles of women and mizvot, forced most commentators to adopt the position that prayer is not time-bound and, therefore, obligates women just like men.
Thus, if a participant enrolled in training that cost $20,000 and covered 2 years, these states would obligate the entire $20,000 at one time.
The agreement must obligate the estate to sell the stock on the shareholder's death.
While funds obligated by DOD for GWOT, including the war with Iraq, in fiscal year 2003 are substantial--about $39 billion through June 2003--the funds appropriated by Congress appear to be sufficient for fiscal year 2003, and some of the services may not obligate all of the funds they were appropriated for fiscal year 2003.
(For example, a call option to buy a bond next month for $1,000 has the potential to become favorable to its holder--the market price of the bond could rise above $1,000 by then.) Likewise, to be a liability, such a contract must obligate a party to exchange on terms that are at least potentially unfavorable.