observance

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And as wholesome meat corrupteth to little worms, so good forms and orders corrupt, into a number of petty observances.
He spent years and years in desultory studies, undertakings, and meditations; he began to evince considerable indifference to social forms and observances.
And, again, this too tranquillized them, by bringing them under the rule of traditional, narrowly localized observances.
I confess that, after passing through a period of sneering incredulity, I have come during my life here to recognize the value of the rites of religion and of religious observances in the family, and to discern the importance of household customs and domestic festivals.
Graham called at Linden-Car, contrary to the expectation of Rose, who entertained an idea that the mysterious occupant of Wildfell Hall would wholly disregard the common observances of civilized life, - in which opinion she was supported by the Wilsons, who testified that neither their call nor the Millwards' had been returned as yet.
The society had a vast number of ceremonies and observances, but it had no history and no object; that was where it was so very aristocratic.
But for these animal observances, you might suppose the whole male portion of the company to be the melancholy ghosts of departed book-keepers, who had fallen dead at the desk: such is their weary air of business and calculation.
While in various silent ways the seamen of the Pequod were evincing their observance of this ominous incident at the first mere mention of the White Whale's name to another ship, Ahab for a moment paused; it almost seemed as though he would have lowered a boat to board the stranger, had not the threatening wind forbade.
The Churchills might not have a word to say in return; but then, you would have no habits of early obedience and long observance to break through.
He had nothing else to do, poor fellow, except at a certain hour of every afternoon to "go to Lloyd's" - in observance of a ceremony of seeing his principal, I think.
As the cavalcade left the court of the monastery, an incident happened somewhat alarming to, the Saxons, who, of all people of Europe, were most addicted to a superstitious observance of omens, and to whose opinions can be traced most of those notions upon such subjects, still to be found among our popular antiquities.
And as he is so scrupulous in his observance of the laws of knight-errantry, he will, no doubt, in order to keep his word, obey the injunction I have laid upon him.