obsolete


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obsolete

adjective abandoned, anachronistic, anachronous, ancient, antediluvian, antiquated, antique, archaistic, bygone, dated, dead, discarded, dismissed, disused, early, expired, extinct, fallen into desuetude, fallen into disuse, no longer in use, obsoletus, old, old-fashioned, out-of-date, out of use, outdated, outmoded, outworn, past, primitive, retired, stale, timeworn, unfashionable, unmodern
Associated concepts: obsolete covenant, obsolete records, obsolete restrictions
See also: defunct, inactive, old, outdated, outmoded

OBSOLETE. This term is applied to those laws which have lost their efficacy, without being repealed,
     2. A positive statute, unrepealed, can never be repealed by non-user alone. 4 Yeates, Rep. 181; Id. 215; 1 Browne's Rep. Appx. 28; 13 Serg. & Rawle, 447. The disuse of a law is at most only presumptive evidence that society has consented to such a repeal; however this presumption may operate on an unwritten law, it cannot in general act upon one which remains as a legislative act on the statute book, because no presumption can set aside a certainty. A written law may indeed become obsolete when the object to which it was intended to apply, or the occasion for which it was enacted, no longer exists. 1 P. A. Browne's R. App. 28. "It must be a very strong case," says Chief Justice Tilghman, "to justify the court in deciding, that an act standing on the statute book, unrepealed, is obsolete and invalid. I will not say that such case may not exist -- where there has been a non-user for a great number of years; where, from a change of times and manners, an ancient sleeping statute would do great mischief, if suddenly brought into action; where a long, practice inconsistent with it has prevailed, and, specially, where from other and latter statutes it might be inferred that in the apprehension of the legislature, the old one was not in force." 13 Serg. & Rawle, 452; Rutherf. Inst. B. 2, c. 6, s. 19; Merl. Repert. mot Desuetude.

References in periodicals archive ?
In some places, there are still those who teach by rote, a practice that became obsolete with the printing of books.
Obsolete pesticides are left over from pest control campaigns.
Although these machines represent technology that is becoming obsolete in the UK, they can perform a very worthwhile and useful role in many developing countries.
It does, however, require running software long after the original hardware on which it ran has become obsolete.
Among the pesticides of concern listed in Baseline Study on the Problem of Obsolete Pesticide Stocks, a 2001 report by the FAO, are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as aldrin, chlordane, DDT, dieldrin, and endrin.
Old, obsolete and duplicate files will create more problems not only because of storage use but also because of the system resources that are required to back them up, including the actual backup processing itself and the additional disk capacity to store the backups.
This requirement has drastically slowed down the process of end-item retransfers, and it has thwarted the exchange between FMS customers of spares and support equipment for the F/A-18, and other items which could be critical for the support of aging or obsolete FMS equipment.
Ibry believes that Judaism is obsolete and must be replaced.
According to the Pesticide Action Network, there are at least 100,000 tons of obsolete pesticide stockpiles in countries around the globe.
became obsolete with the advent of Cindy, Linda, Christy, Claudia, and Naomi--the now almost equally obsolete "supermodels.
obsolete A passage of general significance that may be applied to particular cases.
A middleman--usually a company specializing in setting up barter arrangements buys obsolete or excess inventory at book or wholesale value.