obsolete


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obsolete

adjective abandoned, anachronistic, anachronous, ancient, antediluvian, antiquated, antique, archaistic, bygone, dated, dead, discarded, dismissed, disused, early, expired, extinct, fallen into desuetude, fallen into disuse, no longer in use, obsoletus, old, old-fashioned, out-of-date, out of use, outdated, outmoded, outworn, past, primitive, retired, stale, timeworn, unfashionable, unmodern
Associated concepts: obsolete covenant, obsolete records, obsolete restrictions
See also: defunct, inactive, old, outdated, outmoded

OBSOLETE. This term is applied to those laws which have lost their efficacy, without being repealed,
     2. A positive statute, unrepealed, can never be repealed by non-user alone. 4 Yeates, Rep. 181; Id. 215; 1 Browne's Rep. Appx. 28; 13 Serg. & Rawle, 447. The disuse of a law is at most only presumptive evidence that society has consented to such a repeal; however this presumption may operate on an unwritten law, it cannot in general act upon one which remains as a legislative act on the statute book, because no presumption can set aside a certainty. A written law may indeed become obsolete when the object to which it was intended to apply, or the occasion for which it was enacted, no longer exists. 1 P. A. Browne's R. App. 28. "It must be a very strong case," says Chief Justice Tilghman, "to justify the court in deciding, that an act standing on the statute book, unrepealed, is obsolete and invalid. I will not say that such case may not exist -- where there has been a non-user for a great number of years; where, from a change of times and manners, an ancient sleeping statute would do great mischief, if suddenly brought into action; where a long, practice inconsistent with it has prevailed, and, specially, where from other and latter statutes it might be inferred that in the apprehension of the legislature, the old one was not in force." 13 Serg. & Rawle, 452; Rutherf. Inst. B. 2, c. 6, s. 19; Merl. Repert. mot Desuetude.

References in periodicals archive ?
Possibly the world's biggest supplier of obsolete military and sporting gun parts.
"This means companies are no longer tactically replacing obsolete devices with like-for-likes, but they're replacing fully functional and supported ageing devices.
"We are regularly asked to source refurbished computer (and increasingly, industrial) parts and complete obsolete systems that date from as much as 30 years ago.
Obsolete devices take slightly longer to repair than ageing devices at 3.3 hours, but still in substantially less time than current devices," explained Schofield.
Though the website didn't mention this one, the wristwatch has also been made obsolete. Since I always have my cellphone nearby, clearly displaying the time and date, I stopped wearing watches years ago.
LSH's research analysed 32 regional markets and found that 27 per cent of total regional availability is obsolete (11.7m sq ft) and of this stock 7.4m sq ft is suitable for conversion.
"Put simply, obsolete office space is a drag on our market and offering investors and developers little or no value.
MORE than a quarter of teachers believe textbooks will become obsolete due to the rise of the internet, a poll found today.
HALF of Britons think cash will have become obsolete by 2030 as we embrace new technology to make payments, a survey indicates.
The lini is an obsolete Czarist Russian unit of measurement equal to 2.54 millimeters.
Five and a half centuries earlier, Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press, rendering scribes obsolete and opening the possibilities for libraries and schools full of books.
"An Obsolete Honor: A Story of the German Resistance to Hitler" is a work of historical fiction, but is very believable to have possibly happened in some form.