occupational hazard


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Related to occupational hazard: occupational disease

occupational hazard

n. a danger or risk inherent in certain employments or workplaces, such as deep-sea diving, cutting timber, high-rise steel construction, high-voltage electrical wiring, use of pesticides, painting bridges, and many factories. The risk factor may limit insurance coverage of death or injury while at work.

References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Alam explained that occupational hazards could be psychosocial (violence, stress), biological (communicable diseases), chemical, physical (noise, radiation, slippery surfaces), ergonomic (heavy lifting), and electrical, among others.
Brucellosis: an occupational hazard for medical laboratory personnel.
If the Saudi worker had a contribution period not qualifying him to receive a pension and was re-employed in the private sector after attaining the age of 60, he should be subject to both the Annuities Branch and the Occupational Hazard Branch," Al-Abduljabbar said.
Broxburn-based Brady (left) - who will make his comeback in March after surgery eight-months ago on his damaged left knee - said: "Blowing engines is an occupational hazard.
Andrew Lyman, an executive with the Association of British Bookmakers, said that armed robberies in bookmakers' shops are an occupational hazard.
Shop-owners and the public want to see shoplifters properly punished, not just running the occupational hazard of getting fined if caught, '' he said.
Maybe there are some sacrifices you'll have to make eventually: It's an occupational hazard.
It is of particular importance because of the potential occupational hazard to their staff as well as patients.
At least one member of each of the following three personnel groups must have an active and meaningful role in both the development of the application and the conduct of the proposed project: 1) a research scientist in environmental health sciences (including but not limited to those at NIEHS Environmental Health Sciences Centers, NIEHS Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research, and NIOSH Educational and Research Centers and Agricultural Research Centers); 2) a primary health care provider directly involved in a community affected by one or more environmental or occupational hazards; and 3) a community-based organization in an area having an underserved population that is adversely affected by an environmental or occupational hazard.
Although exile was something of a speciality and an occupational hazard of politics in medieval and Renaissance Italy, it remains a fairly fugitive subject of research in the field.
STRONG winds are normally an occupational hazard at Sunderland, one of the more exposed tracks, but last weekend's storm-force gales were too much even for it to cope with.
A laser can be both an invaluable tool and an occupational hazard.
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