occupational hazard

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occupational hazard

n. a danger or risk inherent in certain employments or workplaces, such as deep-sea diving, cutting timber, high-rise steel construction, high-voltage electrical wiring, use of pesticides, painting bridges, and many factories. The risk factor may limit insurance coverage of death or injury while at work.

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The food we consume, the material of houses we live in, our occupational risk and our living style defines how much radiation dose we consume each day.
The occupational risk experienced by Black American men was similar to that experienced by English-proficient Hispanic men.
If we consider the fact that 10-30% of workers from the evolved countries and 50-79% from the workers from the countries in course of evolution are constantly exposed to occupational risk factors or are working in non-ergonomic conditions we just can draw the conclusion that the problem of evaluating these factors and the study of their genesis (appearance, development, manifestation, effects) is a clef for amelioration/optimization of professional life--the "iceberg" model (Roughton & Mercurio, 2002).
HOUSTON -- Multiple testing is the key to finding bladder cancer in patients at high occupational risk.
To the specific point, Rousmaniere's article quoted John Ingram as regards, "China is gaining in a few years what America achieved in 100 years of managing occupational risk.
Because healthcare workers are required to do a lot of "wet work"--for example, bathing patients or frequent handwashing--skin irritation can be a real occupational risk.
Catching infections from inmates is an occupational risk.
1-3) Occupational risk factors include exposure to wood, metal, rubber, textiles, and petroleum.
Associations between pesticide use and prostate cancer risk among the farm population have been seen in previous studies; farming is the most consistent occupational risk factor for prostate cancer," Michael Alavanja of the National Cancer Institute, who helped lead the study, said in a statement.
It is tested whether occupational risk explains differences in reimbursements from occupational-injury insurance schemes in relation to socioeconomic differences in all municipalities in Stockholm county, Sweden.
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