occupy the field

occupy the field

v. to preempt (monopolize) an area of statutory law by a higher authority, such as Federal preemption of bankruptcy or inter-state commerce over state legislation, and state statutes or state constitution prevailing over laws of cities and counties on certain topics. (See: preemption)

References in periodicals archive ?
Because federal law "contemplates extensive state involvement, Congress clearly did not intend to occupy the field of poultry products," the 9th Circuit said.
In part due to his advantageous position as a researcher in the Stasi archive, including almost unfettered access to Stasi files, Jens Gieseke is able to provide not only an astonishing amount of detail on this once most secretive of organizations but also to foresee the key academic debates that would occupy the field for years to come.
It is the arena of a federal agency, and Congress has repeatedly indicated that it intended for the federal law to occupy the field of immigration.
Denton is rightly seeking to have them identify the actual regulations that supposedly occupy the field.
At this year's Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion, several cherished cars from this period occupy the field in the group for 1927-1951 Racing Cars.
Instead, it would rather forgo the traditional and constrictive labels usually associated with companies that occupy the field, and be satisfied to describe the way in which its offering brings efficiency, while leaving the labeling to others.
The First Circuit inferred an unmistakably clear intent of federal law to occupy the field of pilot regulation related to air safety, to the exclusion of state law and that, in this case, "all flight plans lead to Washington.
Circuit Court of Appeals ruled earlier this year that, as a result of earlier Supreme Court rulings, "federal law does not completely occupy the field of health-insurance coverage for federal workers.
25) Even when it is relatively certain that Congress intended to occupy the field, state law is preempted only to the extent that it actually conflicts with federal interests.
Fukuyama and Furger would create a whole new federal agency to occupy the field.