offence

(redirected from offenses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
See: crime

offence

see CRIME.

OFFENCE, crimes. The doing that which a penal law forbids to be done, or omitting to do what it commands; in this sense it is nearly synonymous with crime. (q.v.) In a more confined sense, it may be considered as having the same meaning with misdemeanor, (q.v.) but it differs from it in this, that it is not indictable, but punishable summarily by the forfeiture of a penalty. 1 Chit. Prac. 14.

References in periodicals archive ?
Taken as a whole the results suggest that prior nonviolent offenses do predict serious nonviolent offending in male delinquents and, in particular, offenses such as malicious injury to property, theft and burglary are predictors of future nonviolent serious offenses.
In addition to duplicating state law, Congress has created derivative offenses, such as racketeering and mall fraud, an approach that makes convictions easier to obtain because the offense consists mainly of otherwise innocuous behavior.
Drug offenses involve the possession, manufacture, and distribution of illegal narcotics.
By offense type, intimidation was the most often reported offense, accounting for 35.2 percent of the total bias-motivated offenses.
Preliminary figures for 2001, excluding the data mentioned above, suggest that the volume of violent crime offenses remained relatively unchanged--a .3 percent increase--when compared with data for 2000; however, the volume of property crime offenses rose by 2.2 percent.
Serious offenses, including robbery, burglary, auto theft, and weapons violations, accounted for just 11 percent of complaints investigated by the Chicago PPOs between 1919 and 1930.
"The laws of at least fifteen states now require life sentences for certain nonviolent marijuana offenses," The Atlantic Monthly reported in April 1997.
In its clearance calculations, the UCR Program counts the number of offenses that are cleared, not the number of persons arrested.
* There were 6,624 single-bias incidents that involved 7,690 offenses, 8,199 victims, and 6,001 offenders.
He also asked the board whether the offenses needed to occur within a year or longer.
If the offense can move the ball out of this area, it can inflict a lot of psychological damage on the defense and brighten their own mental outlook.