offensive weapon


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offensive weapon

any article made or adapted for use for causing injury to a person or intended by the person having it with him for such use by him. A razor is not an offensive weapon in its own right but could be such if intended by the person to be used as such. Any person who, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse, the proof being on that person, has with him in any public place any offensive weapon is guilty of an offence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last year's tally was up by 9% on 2016, with the Ministry of Justice saying the increase in part reflects a 30% rise in police-recorded knife and offensive weapon possession offences in the year to September.
com @reporterlou CRIMINALS convicted of carrying a knife, other offensive weapons or acid are set to face tougher sentences.
Now, Kevin Bennett, 28, of Losh Terrace, Walker, has been charged with attempted wounding with intent, affray, possession of an offensive weapon, aggravated vehicle-taking and failing to provide a specimen.
Knife possession up THE number of criminals caught with knives or offensive weapons, above, has hit its highest level for six years, official figures reveal.
Hunting was charged with possessing an offensive disguised weapon and unloading an offensive weapon relating to a stun gun which was also seized after a flight from Turkey to Newcastle Airport on July 31.
Possession of an offensive weapon or threatening a person with an offensive weapon, which each come with a maximum four-year prison term, are among the "most appropriate" charges which can be brought.
A 16-year-old boy was arrested on suspicion of possession of an offensive weapon and was later charged.
FIVE people were arrested for drug offences and one for carrying an offensive weapon after police targeted motorists travelling to a music festival over the weekend.
Martin McDonagh, 26, from Oak Grove in the town, faces charges of assault occasioning actual bodily harm, possessing an offensive weapon in public and disorderly behaviour.
The bill provides that any person who, without legitimate purpose or lawful authority, carries an offensive weapon in any public place shall be imprisoned from three months to a year and be made to pay a fine of P10,000 to P20,000.
Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill said: "Crimes of handling an offensive weapon, including knives, have dropped dramatically in Inverclyde, falling by a massive 60 per cent since No Knives Better Lives was launched.