offensive work environment

offensive work environment

noun abhorrent workplace, abominable job environment at work, actionnble workplace, execrable milieu at work, hostile workklace, repulsive workplace, unacceptable workplace
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the law doesn't prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted).
Harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favours or other verbal or written communication or physical conduct of a sexual nature or sexually demeaning attitudes, causing interference with work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment, or the attempt to punish the complainant for refusal to comply to such a request or is made a condition for employment.
94) and 2) "Does this create an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment," (Cronbach alpha=.
Description of harassment including any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favours or other verbal or written communication or physical conduct of sexual nature or sexually demeaning attitudes causing interference with work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment, or the attempt to punish the complaint for refusal to comply to such a request or is made a condition for employment.
Fraser argued that the college union created an intimidating, hostile, humiliating, and offensive work environment and filed suit in 2011.
Protection against harassment of women at work place Act 2010, defines harassment as any unwelcome, sexual advance, request for sexual favours or other verbal or written communication creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive work environment.
Similarly, offensive comments about an employee's religious beliefs or practices, or lack of belief, constitute illegal harassment if frequent or so severe that they create a hostile, offensive work environment.
Sexual harassment is defined as "unsolicited and unwelcome comments, gestures or contacts of a sexual nature that affect an individual's employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual's performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.
The new law defines harassment as "any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favours or other verbal and written communication or physical conduct of a sexual nature or sexually demeaning attitudes, causing interference with the work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment, or the attempt to punish the complainant for refusal to comply to such a request or is made condition for employment.
First, the bill defines harassment as: "any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors or other verbal and written communication or physical conduct of a sexual nature or sexually demeaning attitudes, causing interference with the work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment, or the attempt to punish the complainant for refusal to comply to such a request or is made condition for employment.
Sexual harassment, which is defined as unwanted sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and any other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (i) submission to or rejection of this conduct by an individual impacts decisions affecting hiring, evaluation, promotion, retention, or employment; (ii) this conduct interferes with the individual's ability to perform his or her job function or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment, or (iii) sexual conduct that is unwanted and offensive to those individuals who are subjected to it or others who witness it.
Thus, employers may be held liable in these circumstances if they 'fail to remedy or prevent a hostile or offensive work environment of which management-level employees knew, or in the exercise of reasonable care should have known" (Lockard v.